mirage

Geomorphology of the southernmost longitudinal valley fault : implications for evolution of the active suture of eastern Taiwan

DSpace/Manakin Repository

 

Search DR-NTU


Advanced Search Subject Search

Browse

My Account

Geomorphology of the southernmost longitudinal valley fault : implications for evolution of the active suture of eastern Taiwan

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Shyu, J. Bruce H.
dc.contributor.author Sieh, Kerry
dc.contributor.author Chen, Yue-Gau
dc.contributor.author Chuang, Ray Y.
dc.contributor.author Wang, Yu
dc.contributor.author Chung, Ling-Ho
dc.date.accessioned 2012-08-28T01:55:02Z
dc.date.available 2012-08-28T01:55:02Z
dc.date.copyright 2008
dc.date.issued 2012-08-28
dc.identifier.citation Shyu, J. B. H., Sieh, K., Chen, Y. G., Chuang, R. Y., Wang, Y., & Chung, L. H. (2008). Geomorphology of the southernmost longitudinal valley fault: implications for evolution of the active suture of eastern Taiwan. Tectonics, 27.
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10220/8427
dc.description.abstract In order to understand fully the deformational patterns of the Longitudinal Valley fault system, a major structure along the eastern suture of Taiwan, we mapped geomorphic features near the southern end of the Longitudinal Valley, where many well-developed fluvial landforms record deformation along multiple strands of the fault. Our analysis shows that the Longitudinal Valley fault there comprises two major strands. The Luyeh strand, on the west, has predominantly reverse motion. The Peinan strand, on the east, has a significant left-lateral component. Between the two strands, late Quaternary fluvial sediments and surfaces exhibit progressive deformation. The Luyeh strand dies out to the north, where it steps to the east and joins the Peinan strand to become the main strand of the reverse sinistral Longitudinal Valley fault. To the south, the Luyeh strand becomes an E-W striking monocline. This suggests that the reverse motion on the Longitudinal Valley system decreases drastically at that point. The Longitudinal Valley fault system is therefore likely to terminate abruptly there and does not seem to connect to any existing structure further to the south. This abrupt structural change suggests that the development of the Longitudinal Valley suture occurs through discrete structural “jumps,” rather than by a continuous northward maturation.
dc.format.extent 22 p.
dc.language.iso en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Tectonics
dc.rights © 2008 AGU. This paper was published in Tectonics and is made available as an electronic reprint (preprint) with permission of American Geophysical Union. The paper can be found at: DOI [http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2006TC002060]. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic or multiple reproduction, distribution to multiple locations via electronic or other means, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper is prohibited and is subject to penalties under law.
dc.subject DRNTU::Engineering::Civil engineering::Water resources.
dc.title Geomorphology of the southernmost longitudinal valley fault : implications for evolution of the active suture of eastern Taiwan
dc.type Journal Article
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2006TC002060
dc.description.version Published version

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
Geomorphology o ... itudinal Valley faultn.pdf 63.34Mb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Statistics

Total views

All Items Views
Geomorphology of the southernmost longitudinal valley fault : implications for evolution of the active suture of eastern Taiwan 197

Total downloads

All Bitstreams Views
Geomorphology of the Southernmost Longitudinal Valley faultn.pdf 40

Top country downloads

Country Code Views
United States of America 16
Singapore 12
China 4
Unknown Country 2
Japan 1

Top city downloads

city Views
Mountain View 14
Singapore 12