Academic Profile

Dr. Matwick is a Lecturer in the Language and Communication Centre (LCC). She joined NTU in 2018 and teaches Academic Communications in the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences. Her research uses interactional sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, and multimodal analysis to examine food media discourse, specifically cooking shows and cookbooks. With her twin sister Kelsi, Keri wrote a book on ‘food discourse,’ the written, spoken, and visual text about food, including its preparation, preparation, and consumption, and how it expresses individual and collective sociocultural values about food.

She is the inaugural Editor of Pioneer Road, a student journal published by the LCC that features exemplary student works.

Keri welcomes student projects on food and language.
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Dr Keri Matwick
Lecturer, School of Humanities

interactional sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, media discourse, food & language
 
  • NTU Student Foodways and Singapore Heritage
 
  • Matwick, K., & Matwick, K. (2020). Trump-Kim 2018 Singapore Summit and culinary diplomacy: The role of food and symbols in international relations. Place Branding and Public Diplomacy. doi.org/10.1057/s41254-020-00188-x

  • Matwick, K., & Matwick, K. (2019). Linguistic landscape and authenticity in a Japanese supermarket in Singapore. Open Linguistics, 5(1), 532-552.

  • Matwick, K., & Matwick, K. (2019). Food Discourse of Celebrity Chefs of Food Network. Palgrave Macmillan.

  • Matwick, K., & Matwick, K. (2019). Bloopers and backstage talk on TV cooking shows. Text & Talk, 40(1), 49-74.

  • Matwick, K. (2019). Teacher feedback on student drafts. Language and Communication Centre (LCC) Working Papers. Issue 6, 45-50. Nanyang Technological University.

  • Matwick, K., & Matwick, K. (2018). Restaurant reviews and college writing: A framework for teaching. Teaching Journalism & Mass Communication (TJMC), 8(2), 25-37.

  • Matwick, K., & Matwick, K. (2014). Storytelling and synthetic personalization in television cooking shows. Journal of Pragmatics, 71, 151-159. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2014.08.005