Academic Profile : Faculty

Assoc Prof Kwan Sze Pui Uganda.jpeg picture
Assoc Prof Kwan Sze Pui Uganda
Associate Professor, School of Humanities
Director, Master of Arts in Translation and Interpretation (MTI) Programme, School of Humanities (SoH)
Uganda Kwan is Associate Professor at the School of Humanities and Director of the Master of Arts in Translation and Interpretation Programme at Nanyang Technological University. She also serves as an elected Senate Member at NTU, and as Co-Chair of the Ethics Review Committee at the School of Humanities.

Uganda received her PhD from the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London in 2007. Having been awarded Monbukagakushō (Japanese government) scholarship in 2002, she was a research student at Tokyo University, where she also served as a Project Associate Professor in 2009. The experience of studying in Japan defined the research outlook for her future academic pursuits.

With generous support from mentors and respected colleagues, she has received honorary, affiliated and visiting appointments at University College London (2010), Harvard University (2013), Princeton University (2017) and Cambridge University (2018). At present, she is the Principal Investigator in altogether 19 projects. Funding agencies for her recent projects include the Sumitomo Foundation (Japan), Hong Kong Arts and Development Council (HKADC), Singapore Centre for Chinese Language (SCCC), Needham Research Institute (Cambridge University), the Rare Book School at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and the Ministry of Education (MOE), Singapore.

Her main research in translation studies is focused on Asian translation history. Her latest publication is a 61-page paper on a new translation of Euclid’s The Element in 1850 China, and a forthcoming paper entitled “Misnomer or Mistranslation? A ‘mathematical coincidence’ by E.T.R. Moncrieff (1824-1857) and Alexander Wylie (1815-1887) in 1850s China”, in Journal of Chinese Philosophy Special Issue “The Translation of Culture – The Culture of Translation”, 2022.

She also serves on the editorial board of several journals, including the Sungkyun Journal of East Asian Studies (SJEAS) published by Duke University Press.

Uganda is currently supervising three PhD students at the School of Humanities (NTU), Interdisciplinary Graduate Programme (SoH and Engineering School) and University College London (UCL).

Translation Studies Chinese Translation History; Literary translation Comparative Modern Sino-Japanese Literature British Sinology in the 19th Century Hong Kong Literature

 
  • Learning Chinese XYZ(Xing Yin Zi 形音字)through Technical Method: Chinese Characters and Ideograph in Print and Picture (1800-1875)
  • Smart Nation and Knowledge Societies : Chinese Heritage, Translation and Digital Libraries
Awards
2019 - Book Prize, 15th Hong Kong Biennial Awards for Chinese Literature. Hong Kong SAR Government
2018 - Scholarship. Needham Research Institute, Cambridge University
2015 - Scholarship. California Rare Book School at UCLA, UCLA
2010-2 - Shortlisted, The Barwis Holliday Award, Royal Asiatic Society
2002-2004 - Japan Government (Monbukagakusho) Scholarship
 
Fellowships & Other Recognition
2018. Visiting Fellow. Cambridge University.
2017. Visiting Professor, Princeton University
2014. Visiting Fellow. Harvard University.
2009. Project Associate Professor, University of Tokyo.
 
Courses Taught
Translation HIstory, Translation Theories, Translation and Modern China
Book Culture and HIstory, Hong Kong Literature and Culture
 
Supervision of PhD Students
李佳奇 Li Jiaqi. (2020) - 译言与易文:晚清驻英日记的中西文化翻译 = Translating as rewriting : Cultural translation of Chinese envoy diaries in late imperial China.

Pu Chun (2018) - 晚清民初文学语境下的“法国大革命”观念译介 :以王韬、梁启超、曾朴为考察中心 (1890-1912) = Translating the concept of “French Revolution” in the literary context from the late Qing to early republican China : based on the works by Wang Tao, Liang Qichao and Zeng Pu (1890-1912)

Long Chao (2018) - Writing Hong Kong Sinophonicity : History, gender and ethnicity in Hong Kong fiction