Academic Profile : Faculty

Dr Vivek Perumal.jpeg picture
Dr Vivek Perumal
Lecturer, Anatomy, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine
Lecturer, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine
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Dr Vivek Perumal has recently moved from New Zealand and joined our school as a lecturer in anatomy. A physiotherapist by training, he has post graduate qualifications in medical anatomy and clinical education. Before moving to Singapore, Vivek worked at the University of Otago, NZ, from where he also obtained his PhD in clinical anatomy. During his PhD, Vivek looked at the clinical anatomy and biomechanics of the ligamentum teres of the hip joint, and continued to study the post-surgical outcomes following its injuries; the anatomical findings from his PhD are cited in the prestigious Gray’s Anatomy 42e.

To date, he has contributed to 14 publications in peer reviewed journals and a research book chapter; obtained 21 awards for his research and teaching excellence. Vivek has an outstanding record of obtaining the Otago medical students’ teaching excellence award consistently for the past ten years (2011-2020). In the past, he taught clinical & radiological anatomy and hands-on ultrasound imaging to undergraduate and specialist medical courses including the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. 

Professional memberships: 

o Anatomical Society 

o American Association of Clinical Anatomists 

o Australia New Zealand Association of Clinical Anatomists 

 

His research interests are to combine his backgrounds in clinical anatomy and technological innovation thereby maintain research led anatomy education. He is always open for a chat on research discussions and collaborations. Currently he is working on: 

o Surgical outcomes following ligamentum teres injuries in New Zealand 

o Microsurgical and radiological anatomy of the human nervous system 

o Application of art in anatomy education

3D modelling and visualisation of human anatomical structures; 

Innovations in educational technology; 

Clinical anatomy research

 
  • Utility of low-fidelity 3D anatomy models in improving visuospatial understanding among spatially challenged students