Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/104612
Title: Yield strength of human Erythrocyte membranes to impulsive stretching
Authors: Li, Fenfang
Ohl, Claus-Dieter
Chan, Chon U.
Keywords: DRNTU::Science::Biological sciences::Human anatomy and physiology
Issue Date: 2013
Source: Li, F., Chan, C. U., & Ohl, C. (2013). Yield strength of human Erythrocyte membranes to impulsive stretching. Biophysical journal, 105(4), 872-879.
Series/Report no.: Biophysical journal
Abstract: Deformability while remaining viable is an important mechanical property of cells. Red blood cells (RBCs) deform considerably while flowing through small capillaries. The RBC membrane can withstand a finite strain, beyond which it ruptures. The classical yield areal strain of 2-4% for RBCs is generally accepted for a quasi-static strain. It has been noted previously that this threshold strain may be much larger with shorter exposure duration. Here we employ an impulse-like forcing to quantify this yield strain of RBC membranes. In the experiments, RBCs are stretched within tens of microseconds by a strong shear flow generated from a laser-induced cavitation bubble. The deformation of the cells in the strongly confined geometry is captured with a high-speed camera and viability is successively monitored with fluorescence microscopy. We find that the probability of cell survival is strongly dependent on the maximum strain. Above a critical areal strain of ~40%, permanent membrane damage is observed for 50% of the cells. Interestingly, many of the cells do not rupture immediately and exhibit ghosting, but slowly obtain a round shape before they burst. This observation is explained with structural membrane damage leading to subnanometer-sized pores. The cells finally lyse from the colloidal osmotic pressure imbalance.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/104612
http://hdl.handle.net/10220/16564
ISSN: 0006-3495
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bpj.2013.06.045
Fulltext Permission: none
Fulltext Availability: No Fulltext
Appears in Collections:SPMS Journal Articles

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