Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/96220
Title: The knowledge gap hypothesis in Singapore : the roles of socioeconomic status, mass media, and interpersonal discussion on public knowledge of the H1N1 flu pandemic
Authors: Ho, Shirley S.
Keywords: DRNTU::Social sciences::Communication::Communication theories and models
Issue Date: 2012
Source: Ho, S. S. (2012). The knowledge gap hypothesis in Singapore : the roles of socioeconomic status, mass media, and interpersonal discussion on public knowledge of the H1N1 flu pandemic. Mass Communication and Society, 15(5), 695-717. doi:10.1080/15205436.2011.616275
Series/Report no.: Mass communication and society
Abstract: This study applies the knowledge gap hypothesis to examine the direct and interactive influence of socioeconomic status, mass media, and interpersonal discussion on public knowledge of the H1N1 flu pandemic in Singapore. Using a nationally representative random digit-dialing telephone survey of 1,055 adult Singaporeans, results show that attention to newspapers was not associated with a widened knowledge gap about the H1N1 pandemic between the high and low socioeconomic status individuals. Conversely, attention to television news and interpersonal discussion were associated with a narrowed knowledge disparity between the high and low socioeconomic status individuals. Findings suggest that the knowledge gap hypothesis was not supported in this study. Instead, results suggest that attention to television news and interpersonal discussions were associated with a reduced knowledge gap. Household income and risk perceptions were also found to be positively associated with public knowledge about the H1N1 flu pandemic. Both theoretical and practical implications were discussed.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/96220
http://hdl.handle.net/10220/17284
ISSN: 1520-5436
DOI: 10.1080/15205436.2011.616275
Rights: © 2012 Mass Communication & Society Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. All rights reserved. This paper was published by Taylor & Francis in Mass Communication and Society and is made available with permission of Mass Communication & Society Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:WKWSCI Journal Articles

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