dc.contributor.authorYap, Wei Yim
dc.contributor.authorLam, Jasmine Siu Lee
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-21T02:00:51Z
dc.date.available2013-11-21T02:00:51Z
dc.date.copyright2013en_US
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationYap, W. Y., & Lam, J. S. L. (2013). 80 million-twenty-foot-equivalent-unit container port? Sustainability issues in port and coastal development. Ocean & Coastal Management, 71,13-25.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0964-5691en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10220/17804
dc.description.abstractThe container port industry has experienced phenomenal growth over the past decades since the era of containerisation. The continuous population growth, urbanisation and industrialisation will continue to propel seaborne commodity trades which are largely handled via ports. Given that the four busiest container ports of Shanghai, Singapore, Hong Kong and Shenzhen handle significantly high throughputs, this research aims to examine their likely growth paths, sustainability issues in port and coastal development and related policy implications. The paper uses a longitudinal approach to analyse growth patterns that are exhibited by the selected ports in 1990–2010. The results of which will be used to derive scenarios for throughput growth and additional quay length required up to 2025. Container ports could expect to face immense pressure for their traffic-handling systems given that container throughput is projected to increase by several times within the next 15 years. The research contributes to both policy and research by addressing the need for a balanced approach in sustainability for port and coastal development. Increasing capacity does not mean that ports must resort to new terminal/berth construction extensively. If the decision is made to accommodate this growth in throughput, innovative solutions and flexibility in capacity expansion will also be required to accommodate the addition to traffic given the scale involved so as to alleviate pressures on spatial demand and the environment.en_US
dc.format.extent41 p.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOcean & coastal managementen_US
dc.rights© 2013 Elsevier. This is the author created version of a work that has been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by Ocean and Coastal Management, Elsevier. It incorporates referee’s comments but changes resulting from the publishing process, such as copyediting, structural formatting, may not be reflected in this document. The published version is available at: [doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2012.10.011 ].en_US
dc.subjectDRNTU::Engineering::Maritime studies::Maritime management and business
dc.title80 million-twenty-foot-equivalent-unit container port? : sustainability issues in port and coastal developmenten_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.contributor.schoolSchool of Civil and Environmental Engineeringen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2012.10.011
dc.description.versionAccepted versionen_US


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