Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/101563
Title: Human activity negatively affects stone tool-using Burmese long-tailed macaques Macaca fascicularis aurea in Laem Son National Park, Thailand
Authors: Gumert, Michael David
Hamada, Yuzuru.
Malaivijitnond, Suchinda.
Keywords: DRNTU::Social sciences
Issue Date: 2013
Source: Gumert, M. D., Hamada, Y., & Malaivijitnond, S. (2013). Human activity negatively affects stone tool-using Burmese long-tailed macaques Macaca fascicularis aurea in Laem Son National Park, Thailand. Oryx, 47(4), 535-543.
Series/Report no.: Oryx
Abstract: Animal traditions can affect survival by improving how individuals use their environment. They are inherited through social learning and are restricted to small subpopulations. As a result, traditions are rare and their preservation needs to be considered in biodiversity conservation. We studied Burmese long-tailed macaques Macaca fascicularis aurea living on Piak Nam Yai Island in Laem Son National Park, Thailand, which maintain a rare stone tool-using tradition for processing hard-shelled invertebrate prey along the island's shores. We found the population had 192 individuals in nine groups and most individuals used stone tools. This population is under pressure from the local human community through the development of farms and release of domestic dogs Canis familiaris onto the island. The level of anthropogenic impact varied in each macaque groups' range and juvenile–infant composition varied with impact. The proportion of young was smaller in groups overlapping farms and was negatively correlated with the amount of dog activity in their range. We also found that coastal use by macaques was negatively related to living near plantations and that the dogs displaced macaques from the shores in 93% of their encounters. We conclude that human impact is negatively affecting Piak Nam Yai's macaques and are concerned this could disrupt the persistence of their stone-use tradition. we discuss the impact and the potential consequences, and we recommend better protection of coastal areas within Laem Son National Park.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/101563
http://hdl.handle.net/10220/18741
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0030605312000130
Rights: © 2013 Fauna & Flora International. This paper was published in Oryx and is made available as an electronic reprint (preprint) with permission of Fauna & Flora International. The paper can be found at the following official DOI: [http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0030605312000130].  One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic or multiple reproduction, distribution to multiple locations via electronic or other means, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper is prohibited and is subject to penalties under law.
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:HSS Journal Articles

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