dc.contributor.authorLee, Jason KW
dc.contributor.authorAng, Wee Hon
dc.contributor.authorNg, Jonathan WX
dc.contributor.authorFan, Priscilla WP
dc.contributor.authorTeo, Ya Shi
dc.contributor.authorNolte, Heinrich W
dc.contributor.authorYeo, Yvonne YW
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-02T02:19:43Z
dc.date.available2015-02-02T02:19:43Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationLee, J. K., Ang, W. H., Ng, J. W., Fan, P. W., Teo, Y. S., Nolte, H. W., et al. (2014). Effects of a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution on cognitive performance following exercise-induced hyperthermia in humans. Journal of the International society of sports nutrition, 11(51).en_US
dc.identifier.issn1550-2783en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10220/24991
dc.description.abstractBackground: There is limited information on the effects of sports drinks on cognitive function after exercise in the heat. We aimed to investigate the effects of ingesting a commercially available carbohydrate-electrolyte (CHO) solution on cognitive performance following exercise-induced hyperthermia. Methods: Twelve participants completed three practices of cognitive tests, one full familiarisation and two experimental trials in an environmental chamber (dry bulb temperature: 30.2 ± 0.3°C, relative humidity: 70 ± 3%). The experimental trials consisted of five cognitive tests (symbol digit matching, search and memory, digit span, choice reaction time and psychomotor vigilance test) performed before and after a 75-min run on a treadmill at 70% VO2 max. One ml/kg body mass of a 6.8% CHO solution or placebo was consumed at the start, every 15 min during exercise and between cognitive tests after exercise. Core temperature, heart rate, blood glucose concentrations, subjective ratings and cognitive performance were assessed (symbol digit matching, search and memory, digit span, choice reaction time and psychomotor vigilance). Results: Participants were hyperthermic at the end of the run (placebo: 39.5 ± 0.4°C, CHO: 39.6 ± 0.5°C; Mean ± SD; p = 0.37). The change in blood glucose was higher with CHO ingestion (1.6, 0.7 to 4.5 mmol/L) (median, range) than with placebo ingestion (0.9, -0.1 to 4.7 mmol/L; p < 0.05). CHO ingestion reduced the maximum span of digits memorized, in contrast to an increase in maximum span with placebo ingestion (p < 0.05). CHO solution had no effect on other cognitive tests (p > 0.05). Conclusions: These results suggest that CHO solution ingestion may impair short-term memory following exertional heat stress.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of the International society of sports nutritionen_US
dc.rights© 2014 Lee et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.en_US
dc.subjectDRNTU::Science::Medicine
dc.subjectDRNTU::Science::Biological sciences::Human anatomy and physiology
dc.titleEffects of a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution on cognitive performance following exercise-induced hyperthermia in humansen_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.contributor.schoolLee Kong Chian School of Medicine
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12970-014-0051-x
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US


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