dc.contributor.authorSarig, Udi
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Evelyne Bao-Vi
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yao
dc.contributor.authorTing, Sherwin
dc.contributor.authorBronshtein, Tomer
dc.contributor.authorSarig, Hadar
dc.contributor.authorDahan, Nitsan
dc.contributor.authorGvirtz, Maskit
dc.contributor.authorReuveny, Shaul
dc.contributor.authorOh, Steve K.W.
dc.contributor.authorScheper, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorBoey, Yin Chiang Freddy
dc.contributor.authorVenkatraman, Subbu S.
dc.contributor.authorMachluf, Marcelle
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-17T01:49:43Z
dc.date.available2015-06-17T01:49:43Z
dc.date.copyright2015en_US
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationSarig, U., Nguyen, E. B.-V., Wang, Y., Ting, S., Bronshtein, T., Sarig, H, et al. (2015). Pushing the envelope in tissue engineering: ex vivo production of thick vascularized cardiac ECM constructs. Tissue engineering Part A, 21(9-10), 1507-1519.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10220/25922
dc.description.abstractFunctional vascularization is a prerequisite for cardiac tissue engineering of constructs with physiological thicknesses. We previously reported the successful preservation of main vascular conduits in isolated thick acellular porcine cardiac ventricular ECM (pcECM). We now unveil this scaffold's potential in supporting human cardiomyocytes and promoting new blood vessel development ex vivo, providing long-term cell support in the construct bulk. A custom-designed perfusion bioreactor was developed to remodel such vascularization ex vivo, demonstrating, for the first time, functional angiogenesis in vitro with various stages of vessel maturation supporting up to 1.7 mm thick constructs. A robust methodology was developed to assess the pcECM maximal cell capacity, which resembled the human heart cell density. Taken together these results demonstrate feasibility of producing physiological-like constructs such as the thick pcECM suggested here as a prospective treatment for end-stage heart failure. Methodologies reported herein may also benefit other tissues, offering a valuable in vitro setting for “thick-tissue” engineering strategies toward large animal in vivo studies.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTissue engineering Part Aen_US
dc.rights© Udi Sarig et al. 2015; Published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. This Open Access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are credited.en_US
dc.subjectDRNTU::Science::Medicine::Tissue engineering
dc.titlePushing the envelope in tissue engineering : ex vivo production of thick vascularized cardiac ECM constructsen_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.contributor.schoolSchool of Materials Science and Engineeringen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ten.tea.2014.0477
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.rims187197


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