dc.contributor.authorRosenthal, Sonny
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-06T06:17:45Z
dc.date.available2017-01-06T06:17:45Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationRosenthal, S. (2016). Audience Prototypes and Asymmetric Efficacy Beliefs. Journal of Media Psychology, in press.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1864-1105en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10220/41982
dc.description.abstractPrior research suggests that the third-person effect is related to media schemas, for example, that general audiences are vulnerable to influence. The current study evaluates whether the effect of media schemas depends on more specific audience schemas. Participants read descriptions of four “actors” in a 2 (gullible vs critical-minded) × 2 (heavy vs light Internet users) repeated measures experiment and rated how much the actors can resist the influence of media and how much they benefit from censorship. For comparison, participants rated themselves on the same dependent variables. Results show that gullible heavy Internet users are perceived to have the greatest self-regulatory inefficacy and benefit the most from censorship, while the outcome is opposite for critical-minded light Internet users. These patterns remains when evaluating self-other asymmetric efficacy beliefs, which the discussion situates in relation to motivational and cognitive processes underlying the third-person effect.en_US
dc.format.extent31 p.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Media Psychologyen_US
dc.rights© 2016 Hogrefe Publishing. This is the author created version of a work that has been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by Journal of Media Psychology, Hogrefe Publishing. It incorporates referee’s comments but changes resulting from the publishing process, such as copyediting, structural formatting, may not be reflected in this document. The published version is available at: [http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/1864-1105/a000193].en_US
dc.subjectThird-person effecten_US
dc.subjectInternet useen_US
dc.titleAudience Prototypes and Asymmetric Efficacy Beliefsen_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.contributor.schoolWee Kim Wee School of Communication and Informationen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1027/1864-1105/a000193
dc.description.versionAccepted versionen_US


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