Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/84988
Title: Brief Report: Atypical Expression of Distress During the Separation Phase of the Strange Situation Procedure in Infant Siblings at High Risk for ASD
Authors: Esposito, Gianluca
Rostagno, Maria del Carmen
Venuti, Paola
Haltigan, John D.
Messinger, Daniel S.
Keywords: Cry
Autism spectrum disorders
Issue Date: 2013
Source: Esposito, G., Rostagno, M. del C., Venuti, P., Haltigan, J. D., & Messinger, D. S. (2014). Brief Report: Atypical Expression of Distress During the Separation Phase of the Strange Situation Procedure in Infant Siblings at High Risk for ASD. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44(4), 975-980.
Series/Report no.: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Abstract: Previous studies have provided preliminary evidence that disruptions in cry acoustics may be part of an atypical vocal signature of autism early in life. We examined the acoustic characteristics of cries extracted from the separation phase of the strange situation procedure in a sample of toddler of younger siblings of a child with autism spectrum disorder-autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (high risk, HR) and a low risk (LR) group. Cry samples derived from vocal recordings of 15-month-old HR (n = 13) and LR infants (n = 14) were subjected to acoustic analyses. HR toddlers, compared to those with LR, produced cries that were shorter and had a higher fundamental frequency (F0). Three HR toddlers later classified with an ASD at 36 months (autistic disorder in all cases) produced cries that had among the highest F0 and shortest durations. Taken together these results indicate that toddlers at high risk for ASD (and those with an ASD) express atypical patterns of distress in response a social stressor. Implications for early diagnosis and parenting are discussed.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/84988
http://hdl.handle.net/10220/42044
ISSN: 0162-3257
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-013-1940-6
Rights: © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York. This is the author created version of a work that has been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Springer Science+Business Media New York. It incorporates referee’s comments but changes resulting from the publishing process, such as copyediting, structural formatting, may not be reflected in this document. The published version is available at: [http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-013-1940-6].
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:HSS Journal Articles

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