Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/86567
Title: Resource depletion through primate stone technology
Authors: Luncz, Lydia V
Tan, Amanda
Haslam, Michael
Kulik, Lars
Proffitt, Tomos
Malaivijitnond, Suchinda
Gumert, Michael David
Keywords: Primate stone technology
Tool-assisted foraging
Issue Date: 2017
Source: Luncz, L. V., Tan, A., Haslam, M., Kulik, L., Proffitt, T., Malaivijitnond, S., et al. (2017). Resource depletion through primate stone technology. eLife, 6, e23647-.
Series/Report no.: eLife
Abstract: Tool use has allowed humans to become one of the most successful species. However, tool-assisted foraging has also pushed many of our prey species to extinction or endangerment, a technology-driven process thought to be uniquely human. Here, we demonstrate that tool-assisted foraging on shellfish by long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in Khao Sam Roi Yot National Park, Thailand, reduces prey size and prey abundance, with more pronounced effects where the macaque population size is larger. We compared availability, sizes and maturation stages of shellfish between two adjacent islands inhabited by different-sized macaque populations and demonstrate potential effects on the prey reproductive biology. We provide evidence that once technological macaques reach a large enough group size, they enter a feedback loop – driving shellfish prey size down with attendant changes in the tool sizes used by the monkeys. If this pattern continues, prey populations could be reduced to a point where tool-assisted foraging is no longer beneficial to the macaques, which in return may lessen or extinguish the remarkable foraging technology employed by these primates.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/86567
http://hdl.handle.net/10220/44053
ISSN: 2050-084X
DOI: 10.7554/eLife.23647
Rights: © 2017 Luncz et al (Published by eLife Sciences Publications). This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:HSS Journal Articles

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