Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/86484
Title: Salivary α-amylase as a marker of stress reduction in individuals with intellectual disability and autism in response to occupational and music therapy
Authors: Poquérusse, J.
Azhari, Atiqah
Setoh, Peipei
Cainelli, S.
Ripoli, C.
Venuti, P.
Esposito, Gianluca
Keywords: Salivary alpha amylase
Autism Spectrum Disorders
Issue Date: 2017
Source: Poquérusse, J., Azhari, A., Setoh, P., Cainelli, S., Ripoli, C., Venuti, P., et al. (2017). Salivary α-amylase as a marker of stress reduction in individuals with intellectual disability and autism in response to occupational and music therapy. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, in press.
Series/Report no.: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research
Abstract: Background: Although the benefits of a range of disability-centric therapies have been well studied, little remains known about how they work, let alone how to monitor these benefits in a precise and reliable way. Methods: Here, in two independent studies, we examine how sessions consisting of occupational or music therapy, both widely recognised for their effectiveness, modulate levels of salivary α-amylase (sAA), a now time- and cost-efficient marker of stress, in individuals with intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. Pre-session and post-session levels of sAA were compared in both groups in response to therapy and control sessions. Results: In comparison to control sessions, occupational therapy significantly dampened rises in sAA levels while music therapy significantly decreased baseline sAA levels, highlighting the ability of both types of therapy to reduce stress and by proxy contribute to enhancing overall well-being. Conclusions: Not only do these results confirm the stress-reducing nature of two types of multisensory therapy, but they support the use of sAA as a potential tool for evaluating stress levels in individuals with intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder, providing an important physiological lens that may guide strategies in clinical and non-clinical care for individuals with disabilities.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/86484
http://hdl.handle.net/10220/44072
ISSN: 0964-2633
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jir.12453
Rights: © 2017 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is the author created version of a work that has been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, John Wiley & Sons Ltd. It incorporates referee’s comments but changes resulting from the publishing process, such as copyediting, structural formatting, may not be reflected in this document. The published version is available at: [http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jir.12453].
metadata.item.grantfulltext: open
metadata.item.fulltext: With Fulltext
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