dc.contributor.authorPoulidis, Alexandros P.
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Jeremy C.
dc.contributor.authorRenfrew, Ian A.
dc.contributor.authorBarclay, Jenni
dc.contributor.authorHogg, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Susanna F.
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Richard
dc.contributor.authorPyle, David M.
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T05:16:56Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T05:16:56Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationPoulidis, A. P., Phillips, J. C., Renfrew, I. A., Barclay, J., Hogg, A., Jenkins, S. F., et al. (2018). Meteorological controls on local and regional volcanic ash dispersal. Scientific Reports, 8(1), 6873-.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10220/45311
dc.description.abstractVolcanic ash has the capacity to impact human health, livestock, crops and infrastructure, including international air traffic. For recent major eruptions, information on the volcanic ash plume has been combined with relatively coarse-resolution meteorological model output to provide simulations of regional ash dispersal, with reasonable success on the scale of hundreds of kilometres. However, to predict and mitigate these impacts locally, significant improvements in modelling capability are required. Here, we present results from a dynamic meteorological-ash-dispersion model configured with sufficient resolution to represent local topographic and convectively-forced flows. We focus on an archetypal volcanic setting, Soufrière, St Vincent, and use the exceptional historical records of the 1902 and 1979 eruptions to challenge our simulations. We find that the evolution and characteristics of ash deposition on St Vincent and nearby islands can be accurately simulated when the wind shear associated with the trade wind inversion and topographically-forced flows are represented. The wind shear plays a primary role and topographic flows a secondary role on ash distribution on local to regional scales. We propose a new explanation for the downwind ash deposition maxima, commonly observed in volcanic eruptions, as resulting from the detailed forcing of mesoscale meteorology on the ash plume.en_US
dc.format.extent11 p.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesScientific Reportsen_US
dc.rights© 2018 The Author(s) (Nature Publishing Group). This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.subjectVolcanic Ash Dispersalen_US
dc.subjectMeteorological Controlsen_US
dc.titleMeteorological controls on local and regional volcanic ash dispersalen_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.contributor.researchEarth Observatory of Singaporeen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-24651-1
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US


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