Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/87972
Title: Balancing the playing field : collaborative gaming for physical training
Authors: Mace, Michael
Kinany, Nawal
Rinne, Paul
Rayner, Anthony
Bentley, Paul
Burdet, Etienne
Keywords: DRNTU::Engineering::Mechanical engineering
Social Interaction
Collaboration
Issue Date: 2017
Source: Mace, M., Kinany, N., Rinne, P., Rayner, A., Bentley, P., & Burdet, E. (2017). Balancing the playing field : collaborative gaming for physical training. Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 14, 116-.
Series/Report no.: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
Abstract: Background: Multiplayer video games promoting exercise-based rehabilitation may facilitate motor learning, by increasing motivation through social interaction. However, a major design challenge is to enable meaningful inter-subject interaction, whilst allowing for significant skill differences between players. We present a novel motor-training paradigm that allows real-time collaboration and performance enhancement, across a wide range of inter-subject skill mismatches, including disabled vs. able-bodied partnerships. Methods: A virtual task consisting of a dynamic ball on a beam, is controlled at each end using independent digital force-sensing handgrips. Interaction is mediated through simulated physical coupling and locally-redundant control. Game performance was measured in 16 healthy-healthy and 16 patient-expert dyads, where patients were hemiparetic stroke survivors using their impaired arm. Dual-player was compared to single-player performance, in terms of score, target tracking, stability, effort and smoothness; and questionnaires probing user-experience and engagement. Results: Performance of less-able subjects (as ranked from single-player ability) was enhanced by dual-player mode, by an amount proportionate to the partnership’s mismatch. The more abled partners’ performances decreased by a similar amount. Such zero-sum interactions were observed for both healthy-healthy and patient-expert interactions. Dual-player was preferred by the majority of players independent of baseline ability and subject group; healthy subjects also felt more challenged, and patients more skilled. Conclusion: This is the first demonstration of implicit skill balancing in a truly collaborative virtual training task leading to heightened engagement, across both healthy subjects and stroke patients.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/87972
http://hdl.handle.net/10220/45591
ISSN: 1743-0003
DOI: 10.1186/s12984-017-0319-x
Rights: © 2017 The Author(s). This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:MAE Journal Articles

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