Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/89442
Title: A solvent-free surface suspension melt technique for making biodegradable PCL membrane scaffolds for tissue engineering applications
Authors: Leong, Kah Fai
Chua, Chee Kai
Suntornnond, Ratima
An, Jia
Tijore, Ajay
Tan, Lay Poh
Keywords: Polycaprolactone
DRNTU::Engineering::Mechanical engineering
Biodegradable Polymers
Issue Date: 2016
Source: Suntornnond, R., An, J., Tijore, A., Leong, K. F., Chua, C. K., & Tan, L. P. (2016). A solvent-free surface suspension melt technique for making biodegradable PCL membrane scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Molecules, 21(3), 386-. doi:10.3390/molecules21030386
Series/Report no.: Molecules
Abstract: In tissue engineering, there is limited availability of a simple, fast and solvent-free process for fabricating micro-porous thin membrane scaffolds. This paper presents the first report of a novel surface suspension melt technique to fabricate a micro-porous thin membrane scaffolds without using any organic solvent. Briefly, a layer of polycaprolactone (PCL) particles is directly spread on top of water in the form of a suspension. After that, with the use of heat, the powder layer is transformed into a melted layer, and following cooling, a thin membrane is obtained. Two different sizes of PCL powder particles (100 µm and 500 µm) are used. Results show that membranes made from 100 µm powders have lower thickness, smaller pore size, smoother surface, higher value of stiffness but lower ultimate tensile load compared to membranes made from 500 µm powder. C2C12 cell culture results indicate that the membrane supports cell growth and differentiation. Thus, this novel membrane generation method holds great promise for tissue engineering.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/89442
http://hdl.handle.net/10220/46267
ISSN: 1420-3049
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules21030386
Rights: © 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons by Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:MAE Journal Articles

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