Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/86222
Title: Offline digital education for postregistration health professions : systematic review and meta-analysis by the digital health education collaboration
Authors: Posadzki, Pawel
Bala, Malgorzata M.
Kyaw, Bhone Myint
Semwal, Monika
Divakar, Ushashree
Koperny, Magdalena
Sliwka, Agnieszka
Car, Josip
Keywords: Systematic Review
Randomized Controlled Trial
Science::Medicine
Issue Date: 2019
Source: Posadzki, P., Bala, M. M., Kyaw, B. M., Semwal, M., Divakar, U., Koperny, M., . . . Car, J. (2019). Offline digital education for postregistration health professions : systematic review and meta-analysis by the digital health education collaboration. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 21(4), e12968-. doi:10.2196/12968
Series/Report no.: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Abstract: Background: The shortage and disproportionate distribution of health care workers worldwide is further aggravated by the inadequacy of training programs, difficulties in implementing conventional curricula, deficiencies in learning infrastructure, or a lack of essential equipment. Offline digital education has the potential to improve the quality of health professions education. Objective: The primary objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of offline digital education compared with various controls in improving learners’ knowledge, skills, attitudes, satisfaction, and patient-related outcomes. The secondary objectives were (1) to assess the cost-effectiveness of the interventions and (2) to assess adverse effects of the interventions on patients and learners. Methods: We searched 7 electronic databases and 2 trial registries for randomized controlled trials published between January 1990 and August 2017. We used Cochrane systematic review methods. Results: A total of 27 trials involving 4618 individuals were included in this systematic review. Meta-analyses found that compared with no intervention, offline digital education (CD-ROM) may increase knowledge in nurses (standardized mean difference [SMD]=1.88; 95% CI 1.14 to 2.62; participants=300; studies=3; I2=80%; low certainty evidence). A meta-analysis of 2 studies found that compared with no intervention, the effects of offline digital education (computer-assisted training [CAT]) on nurses and physical therapists’ knowledge were uncertain (SMD 0.55; 95% CI –0.39 to 1.50; participants=64; I2=71%; very low certainty evidence). A meta-analysis of 2 studies found that compared with traditional learning, a PowerPoint presentation may improve the knowledge of patient care personnel and pharmacists (SMD 0.76; 95% CI 0.29 to 1.23; participants=167; I2=54%; low certainty evidence). A meta-analysis of 4 studies found that compared with traditional training, the effects of computer-assisted training on skills in community (mental health) therapists, nurses, and pharmacists were uncertain (SMD 0.45; 95% CI –0.35 to 1.25; participants=229; I2=88%; very low certainty evidence). A meta-analysis of 4 studies found that compared with traditional training, offline digital education may have little effect or no difference on satisfaction scores in nurses and mental health therapists (SMD –0.07; 95% CI –0.42 to 0.28, participants=232; I2=41%; low certainty evidence). A total of 2 studies found that offline digital education may have little or no effect on patient-centered outcomes when compared with blended learning. For skills and attitudes, the results were mixed and inconclusive. None of the studies reported adverse or unintended effects of the interventions. Only 1 study reported costs of interventions. The risk of bias was predominantly unclear and the certainty of the evidence ranged from low to very low. Conclusions: There is some evidence to support the effectiveness of offline digital education in improving learners’ knowledge and insufficient quality and quantity evidence for the other outcomes. Future high-quality studies are needed to increase generalizability and inform use of this modality of education.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/86222
http://hdl.handle.net/10220/49272
ISSN: 1439-4456
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/12968
Rights: © 2019 Pawel Posadzki, Malgorzata M Bala, Bhone Myint Kyaw, Monika Semwal, Ushashree Divakar, Magdalena Koperny, Agnieszka Sliwka, Josip Car. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 24.04.2019. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://www.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.
metadata.item.grantfulltext: open
metadata.item.fulltext: With Fulltext
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