Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/79856
Title: Does deciding among morally relevant options feel like making a choice? How morality constrains people’s sense of choice.
Authors: Kouchaki, Maryam
Smith, Isaac H.
Savani, Krishna
Keywords: Morality
Choice
Business::Management
Issue Date: 2018
Source: Kouchaki, M., Smith, I. H., & Savani, K. (2018). Does deciding among morally relevant options feel like making a choice? How morality constrains people’s sense of choice. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 115(5), 788-804. doi:10.1037/pspa0000128
Series/Report no.: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
Abstract: We demonstrate that a difference exists between objectively having and psychologically perceiving multiple-choice options of a given decision, showing that morality serves as a constraint on people’s perceptions of choice. Across 8 studies (N = 2,217), using both experimental and correlational methods, we find that people deciding among options they view as moral in nature experience a lower sense of choice than people deciding among the same options but who do not view them as morally relevant. Moreover, this lower sense of choice is evident in people’s attentional patterns. When deciding among morally relevant options displayed on a computer screen, people devote less visual attention to the option that they ultimately reject, suggesting that when they perceive that there is a morally correct option, they are less likely to even consider immoral options as viable alternatives in their decision-making process. Furthermore, we find that experiencing a lower sense of choice because of moral considerations can have downstream behavioral consequences: after deciding among moral (but not nonmoral) options, people (in Western cultures) tend to choose more variety in an unrelated task, likely because choosing more variety helps them reassert their sense of choice. Taken together, our findings suggest that morality is an important factor that constrains people’s perceptions of choice, creating a disjunction between objectively having a choice and subjectively perceiving that one has a choice.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/79856
http://hdl.handle.net/10220/50162
ISSN: 0022-3514
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pspa0000128
Rights: © American Psychological Association, 2018. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pspa0000128
metadata.item.grantfulltext: open
metadata.item.fulltext: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:NBS Journal Articles

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