dc.contributor.authorXu, Hong
dc.contributor.authorDayan, Peter
dc.contributor.authorLipkin, Richard M.
dc.contributor.authorQian, Ning
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-05T07:00:44Z
dc.date.available2011-07-05T07:00:44Z
dc.date.copyright2008en_US
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationXu, H., Dayan, P., Lipkin, R. M., & Qian, N. (2008). Adaptation across the cortical hierarchy: low-level curve adaptation affects high-level facial-expression judgments. The Journal of Neuroscience, 28(13), 3374-3383.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0270-6474en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10220/6854
dc.description.abstractAdaptation is ubiquitous in sensory processing. Although sensory processing is hierarchical, with neurons at higher levels exhibiting greater degrees of tuning complexity and invariance than those at lower levels, few experimental or theoretical studies address how adaptation at one hierarchical level affects processing at others. Nevertheless, this issue is critical for understanding cortical coding and computation. Therefore, we examined whether perception of high-level facial expressions can be affected by adaptation to low-level curves (i.e., the shape of a mouth). After adapting to a concave curve, subjects more frequently perceived faces as happy, and after adapting to a convex curve, subjects more frequently perceived faces as sad.Weobserved this multilevel aftereffect with both cartoon and real test faces when the adapting curve and the mouths of the test faces had the same location. However, when we placed the adapting curve 0.2° below the test faces, the effect disappeared. Surprisingly, this positional specificity held even when real faces, instead of curves, were the adapting stimuli, suggesting that it is a general property for facial-expression after effects.We also studied the converse question of whether face adaptation affects curvature judgments, and found such effects after adapting to a cartoon face, but not a real face. Our results suggest that there is a local component in facial-expression representation, in addition to holistic representations emphasized in previous studies. By showing that adaptation can propagate up the cortical hierarchy, our findings also challenge existing functional accounts of adaptation.en_US
dc.format.extent10 p.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesThe journal of neuroscienceen_US
dc.rights© 2008 Society for Neuroscience. This paper was published in The Journal of Neuroscience and is made available as an electronic reprint (preprint) with permission of Society for Neuroscience. The paper can be found at the following official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0182-08.2008. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic or multiple reproduction, distribution to multiple locations via electronic or other means, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper is prohibited and is subject to penalties under law.en_US
dc.subjectDRNTU::Social sciences::Sociology
dc.titleAdaptation across the cortical hierarchy : low-level curve adaptation affects high-level facial-expression judgmentsen_US
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.contributor.schoolSchool of Humanities and Social Sciencesen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0182-08.2008
dc.description.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.rims148236


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