Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/101613
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dc.contributor.authorVij, Shubhaen
dc.contributor.authorEitel, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorHo, Hao Keeen
dc.contributor.authorBabu, Deepaken
dc.contributor.authorNarasimhan, Vijayashankaranarayananen
dc.contributor.authorTiku, Varneshen
dc.contributor.authorWestbrook, Jodyen
dc.contributor.authorSchierwater, Bernden
dc.contributor.authorRoy, Sudiptoen
dc.contributor.authorRink, Jochen C.en
dc.contributor.editorMalik, Harmit S.en
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-22T06:03:48Zen
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-06T20:41:27Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-22T06:03:48Zen
dc.date.available2019-12-06T20:41:27Z-
dc.date.copyright2012en
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationVij, S., Rink, J. C., Ho, H. K., Babu, D., Eitel, M., Narasimhan, V., et al. (2012). Evolutionarily ancient association of the FoxJ1 transcription factor with the motile ciliogenic program. PLoS genetics, 8(11), e1003019.en
dc.identifier.issn1553-7404en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10356/101613-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10220/18689en
dc.description.abstractIt is generally believed that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) was a unicellular organism with motile cilia. In the vertebrates, the winged-helix transcription factor FoxJ1 functions as the master regulator of motile cilia biogenesis. Despite the antiquity of cilia, their highly conserved structure, and their mechanism of motility, the evolution of the transcriptional program controlling ciliogenesis has remained incompletely understood. In particular, it is presently not known how the generation of motile cilia is programmed outside of the vertebrates, and whether and to what extent the FoxJ1-dependent regulation is conserved. We have performed a survey of numerous eukaryotic genomes and discovered that genes homologous to foxJ1 are restricted only to organisms belonging to the unikont lineage. Using a mis-expression assay, we then obtained evidence of a conserved ability of FoxJ1 proteins from a number of diverse phyletic groups to activate the expression of a host of motile ciliary genes in zebrafish embryos. Conversely, we found that inactivation of a foxJ1 gene in Schmidtea mediterranea, a platyhelminth (flatworm) that utilizes motile cilia for locomotion, led to a profound disruption in the differentiation of motile cilia. Together, all of these findings provide the first evolutionary perspective into the transcriptional control of motile ciliogenesis and allow us to propose a conserved FoxJ1-regulated mechanism for motile cilia biogenesis back to the origin of the metazoans.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPLoS geneticsen
dc.rights© 2012 The Authors. This paper was published in PLOS Genetics and is made available as an electronic reprint (preprint) with permission of the authors. The paper can be found at the following official DOI: [http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003019].  One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic or multiple reproduction, distribution to multiple locations via electronic or other means, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper is prohibited and is subject to penalties under law.en
dc.subjectDRNTU::Science::Biological sciencesen
dc.titleEvolutionarily ancient association of the FoxJ1 transcription factor with the motile ciliogenic programen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.schoolSchool of Biological Sciencesen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1003019en
dc.description.versionPublished versionen
item.grantfulltextopen-
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