Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/137870
Title: Highly stable and stretchable conductive films through thermal‐radiation‐assisted metal encapsulation
Authors: Liu, Zhiyuan
Wang, Hui
Huang, Pingao
Huang, Jianping
Zhang, Yu
Wang, Yuanyuan
Yu, Mei
Chen, Shixiong
Qi, Dianpeng
Wang, Ting
Jiang, Ying
Chen, Geng
Hu, Guoyu
Li, Wenlong
Yu, Jiancan
Luo, Yifei
Loh, Xian Jun
Liedberg, Bo
Li, Guanglin
Chen, Xiaodong
Keywords: Engineering::Materials
Issue Date: 2019
Source: Liu, Z., Wang, H., Huang, P., Huang, J., Zhang, Y., Wang, Y., . . . Chen, X. (2019). Highly stable and stretchable conductive films through thermal‐radiation‐assisted metal encapsulation. Advanced materials, 31(35), 1901360-. doi:10.1002/adma.201901360
Journal: Advanced materials
Abstract: Stretchable conductors are the basic units of advanced flexible electronic devices, such as skin‐like sensors, stretchable batteries and soft actuators. Current fabrication strategies are mainly focused on the stretchability of the conductor with less emphasis on the huge mismatch of the conductive material and polymeric substrate, which results in stability issues during long‐term use. Thermal‐radiation‐assisted metal encapsulation is reported to construct an interlocking layer between polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and gold by employing a semipolymerized PDMS substrate to encapsulate the gold clusters/atoms during thermal deposition. The stability of the stretchable conductor is significantly enhanced based on the interlocking effect of metal and polymer, with high interfacial adhesion (>2 MPa) and cyclic stability (>10 000 cycles). Also, the conductor exhibits superior properties such as high stretchability (>130%) and large active surface area (>5:1 effective surface area/geometrical area). It is noted that this method can be easily used to fabricate such a stretchable conductor in a wafer‐scale format through a one‐step process. As a proof of concept, both long‐term implantation in an animal model to monitor intramuscular electric signals and on human skin for detection of biosignals are demonstrated. This design approach brings about a new perspective on the exploration of stretchable conductors for biomedical applications.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/137870
ISSN: 0935-9648
DOI: 10.1002/adma.201901360
Rights: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Liu, Z., Wang, H., Huang, P., Huang, J., Zhang, Y., Wang, Y., . . . Chen, X. (2019). Highly stable and stretchable conductive films through thermal‐radiation‐assisted metal encapsulation. Advanced materials, 31(35), 1901360-. doi:10.1002/adma.201901360, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201901360. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:MSE Journal Articles

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