Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/139651
Title: Modelling non-alcoholic fatty liver disease using patient derived liver stem cells and hepatic organoids
Authors: Lim, Yee Siang
Keywords: Science::Biological sciences
Issue Date: 2019
Publisher: Nanyang Technological University
Source: Lim, Y. S. (2019). Modelling non-alcoholic fatty liver disease using patient derived liver stem cells and hepatic organoids. Doctoral thesis, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is described as a global epidemic. With no approved drugs in the market, the disease imposes huge economic and healthcare burden to the society. In-vitro models are deemed as a potential method to test and screen drugs. Hepatic organoids (HOs) differentiated from adult stem cells derived from the liver are attractive in-vitro models due to its ability to recapitulate functions of the liver. In-vitro models were established using tissues from Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) patients and healthy donors. A transcriptomics approach was taken to determine if HOs from NASH donors can better recapitulate the disease in-vitro. It was discovered that NASH HOs have increased expression of genes associated to NASH. Inducing steatosis resulted in distinct upregulation of genes in NASH HOs which are associated to worse outcome in NAFLD patients. Together, the analysis suggests that HOs from NASH donors are better in-vitro models to recapitulate NAFLD.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/139651
Rights: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC 4.0).
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
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