Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/141468
Title: Effect of glucose on the mobility of membrane-adhering liposomes
Authors: Gillissen, Jurriaan J. J.
Tabaei, Seyed Ruhollah
Jackman, Joshua Alexander
Cho, Nam-Joon
Keywords: Engineering::Materials
Issue Date: 2017
Source: Gillissen, J. J. J., Tabaei, S. R., Jackman, J. A., & Cho, N.-J. (2018). Effect of glucose on the mobility of membrane-adhering liposomes. Langmuir, 34(1), 503-511. doi:10.1021/acs.langmuir.7b03364
Journal: Langmuir
Abstract: Enclosed lipid bilayer structures, referred to as liposomes or lipid vesicles, have a wide range of biological functions, such as cellular signaling and membrane trafficking. The efficiency of cellular uptake of liposomes, a key step in many of these functions, is strongly dependent on the contact area between a liposome and a cell membrane, which is governed by the adhesion force w, the membrane bending energy κ, and the osmotic pressure Δp. Herein, we investigate the relationship between these forces and the physicochemical properties of the solvent, namely, the presence of glucose (a nonionic osmolyte). Using fluorescence microscopy, we measure the diffusivity D of small (∼50 nm radius), fluorescently labeled liposomes adhering to a supported lipid bilayer or to the freestanding membrane of a giant (∼10 μm radius) liposome. It is observed that glucose in solution reduces D on the supported membrane, while having negligible effect on D on the freestanding membrane. Using well-known hydrodynamic theory for the diffusivity of membrane inclusions, these observations suggest that glucose enhances the contact area between the small liposomes and the underlying membrane, while not affecting the viscosity of the underlying membrane. In addition, quartz crystal microbalance experiments showed no significant change in the hydrodynamic height of the adsorbed liposomes, upon adding glucose. This observation suggests that instead of osmotic deflation, glucose enhances the contact area via adhesion forces, presumably due to the depletion of the glucose molecules from the intermembrane hydration layer.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/141468
ISSN: 0743-7463
DOI: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.7b03364
Rights: © 2017 American Chemical Society. All rights reserved.
Fulltext Permission: none
Fulltext Availability: No Fulltext
Appears in Collections:MSE Journal Articles

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