Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/142443
Title: Biofilm formation inhibition and dispersal of multi-species communities containing ammonia-oxidising bacteria
Authors: Keshvardoust, Pejhman
Huron, Vanessa A. A.
Clemson, Matthew
Constancias, Florentin
Barraud, Nicolas
Rice, Scott A.
Keywords: Science::Biological sciences
Issue Date: 2019
Source: Keshvardoust, P., Huron, V. A. A., Clemson, M., Constancias, F., Barraud, N., & Rice, S. A. (2019). Biofilm formation inhibition and dispersal of multi-species communities containing ammonia-oxidising bacteria. npj Biofilms and Microbiomes, 5(1), 22-. doi:10.1038/s41522-019-0095-4
Journal: npj Biofilms and Microbiomes
Abstract: Despite considerable research, the biofilm-forming capabilities of Nitrosomonas europaea are poorly understood for both mono and mixed-species communities. This study combined biofilm assays and molecular techniques to demonstrate that N. europaea makes very little biofilm on its own, and relies on the activity of associated heterotrophic bacteria to establish a biofilm. However, N. europaea has a vital role in the proliferation of mixed-species communities under carbon-limited conditions, such as in drinking water distribution systems, through the provision of organic carbon via ammonia oxidation. Results show that the addition of nitrification inhibitors to mixed-species nitrifying cultures under carbon-limited conditions disrupted biofilm formation and caused the dispersal of pre-formed biofilms. This dispersal effect was not observed when an organic carbon source, glucose, was included in the medium. Interestingly, inhibition of nitrification activity of these mixed-species biofilms in the presence of added glucose resulted in increased total biofilm formation compared to controls without the addition of nitrification inhibitors, or with only glucose added. This suggests that active AOB partially suppress or limit the overall growth of the heterotrophic bacteria. The experimental model developed here provides evidence that ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) are involved in both the formation and maintenance of multi-species biofilm communities. The results demonstrate that the activity of the AOB not only support the growth and biofilm formation of heterotrophic bacteria by providing organic carbon, but also restrict and limit total biomass in mixed community systems.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/142443
ISSN: 2055-5008
DOI: 10.1038/s41522-019-0095-4
Rights: © 2019 The Author(s). Published in partnership with Nanyang Technological University. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:SCELSE Journal Articles

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