Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/143592
Title: Inaudible components of the human infant cry influence haemodynamic responses in the breast region of mothers
Authors: Doi, Hirokazu
Sulpizio, Simone
Esposito, Gianluca
Katou, Masahiro
Nishina, Emi
Iriguchi, Mayuko
Honda, Manabu
Oohashi, Tsutomu
Bornstein, Marc H
Shinohara, Kazuyuki
Keywords: Social sciences::Psychology
Issue Date: 2019
Source: Doi, H., Sulpizio, S., Esposito, G., Katou, M., Nishina, E., Iriguchi, M., . . . Shinohara, K. (2019). Inaudible components of the human infant cry infuence haemodynamic responses in the breast region of mothers. The Journal of Physiological Sciences, 69(6), 1085-1096. doi:10.1007/s12576-019-00729-x
Journal: The Journal of Physiological Sciences 
Abstract: Distress vocalizations are fundamental for survival, and both sonic and ultrasonic components of such vocalizations are preserved phylogenetically among many mammals. On this basis, we hypothesized that ultrasonic inaudible components of the acoustic signal might play a heretofore hidden role in humans as well. By investigating the human distress vocalization (infant cry), here we show that, similar to other species, the human infant cry contains ultrasonic components that modulate haemodynamic responses in mothers, without the mother being consciously aware of those modulations. In two studies, we measured the haemodynamic activity in the breasts of mothers while they were exposed to the ultrasonic components of infant cries. Although mothers were not aware of ultrasounds, the presence of the ultrasounds in combination with the audible components increased oxygenated haemoglobin concentration in the mothers' breast region. This modulation was observed only when the body surface was exposed to the ultrasonic components. These findings provide the first evidence indicating that the ultrasonic components of the acoustic signal play a role in human mother-infant interaction.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/143592
ISSN: 1880-6546
DOI: 10.1007/s12576-019-00729-x
Rights: © 2019 The Physiological Society of Japan and Springer Japan KK, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved. This paper was published in The Journal of Physiological Sciences and is made available with permission of The Physiological Society of Japan and Springer Japan KK, part of Springer Nature.
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:SSS Journal Articles

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