Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/143673
Title: Holocene evolution of the Chan May coastal embayment, central Vietnam : changing coastal dynamics associated with decreasing rates of progradation possibly forced by mid- to late-Holocene sea-level changes
Authors: Gouramanis, C.
Switzer, Adam D.
Bristow, C. S.
Pham, D. T.
Mauz, B.
Hoang, Q. D.
Lam, D. D.
Lee, Yingsin
Soria, Janneli Lea Acierto
Pile, Jeremy
Chi, N. T. K.
Nghiem, D.
Sloss, C.
Keywords: Science::Geology
Issue Date: 2020
Source: Gouramanis, C., Switzer, A. D., Bristow, C. S., Pham, D. T., Mauz, B., Hoang, Q. D., ... Sloss, C. (2020). Holocene evolution of the Chan May coastal embayment, central Vietnam : changing coastal dynamics associated with decreasing rates of progradation possibly forced by mid- to late-Holocene sea-level changes. Geomorphology, 367, 107273-. doi:10.1016/j.geomorph.2020.107273
Journal: Geomorphology
Abstract: Southeast Asian coastal environments are undergoing massive transformations with unprecedented population and infrastructure development. These transformations are occurring on a backdrop of intense natural and anthropogenic environmental change, which are increasing the risk to the burgeoning coastal population. Little is known about how central Vietnamese coastal environments have changed naturally since the mid-Holocene sea-level highstand and how recent anthropogenic change and sea-level variation have affected the coastal system. The Chan May embayment in central Vietnam allows us to examine how recent changes in both anthropogenic development and sea-level change have affected the coastline. The embayment preserves a series of prograding beach ridges and is subject to intense human pressures with the construction of a large economic and industrial park, and expansion of tourist facilities. Using ground penetrating radar and quartz optical dating we identify a switch from 6000 years of prograding beach ridges to transgressive dunes within the past century resulting in a decreasing rate of beach ridge progradation possibly in the last 100 years. The recent modes of sediment deposition through washovers and a transgressive dune indicates that coastal progradation has slowed and might have stopped.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/143673
ISSN: 0169-555X
DOI: 10.1016/j.geomorph.2020.107273
Rights: © 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:ASE Journal Articles

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