Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/144653
Title: Investigating genomic instability features in hereditary cancers
Authors: Chu, Yuen Theng
Keywords: Science::Medicine
Science::Biological sciences
Issue Date: 2020
Publisher: Nanyang Technological University
Abstract: Cancer refers to group of diseases characterised by uncontrolled proliferation. Various pathways safeguard a cell from cancer and a single cell usually requires multiple mutations to become cancerous. Mutation resulting in genome instability predisposes an individual to accumulate mutations, ultimately leading to cancer. DNA damage causing double stranded breaks (DSBs) are efficiently repaired via non homologous end joining (NHEJ) or Homologous recombination (HR). Our focus is on mechanisms of damage response proteins, RAD51C and BRCA1 in HR, an error free repair that involves resolution of holiday junctions at sites of homologous recombination exchange of DNA. Defects in HR affects sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs, thus a proper understanding of DDR proteins involved in HR is required. Here we review the role of RAD51C on preserving genome stability through observing characteristics of variants upon drug treatments. We found that a specific variant A87E accumulated less breaks compared to other variants E49K and L134S upon ATRi and MMC treatment. BrdU incorporation was proportionally increased relative to damage observed, suggesting the role of DSBs in inducing repair. S33pRPA expression was also decreased upon etoposide treatment in BRCA1 deficient cells. Together, these results demonstrate that certain mutations exhibit increased resistance to specific drugs.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/144653
Fulltext Permission: restricted
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:SBS Student Reports (FYP/IA/PA/PI)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
FYP thesis - Yuen Theng.pdf
  Restricted Access
553.18 kBAdobe PDFView/Open

Page view(s)

138
Updated on May 18, 2022

Download(s)

16
Updated on May 18, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Items in DR-NTU are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.