Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/145845
Title: Sensitivity study of weather research and forecasting physical schemes and evaluation of cool coating effects in Singapore by weather research and forecasting coupled with urban canopy model simulations
Authors: Zhou, Mandi
Long, Yongping
Zhang, Xiaoqin
Donthu, Eswara V. S. K. K.
Ng, Bing Feng
Wan, Man Pun
Keywords: Engineering::Mechanical engineering
Issue Date: 2020
Source: Zhou, M., Long, Y., Zhang, X., Donthu, Eswara V. S. K. K., Ng, B. F., & Wan, M. P. (2020). Sensitivity study of weather research and forecasting physical schemes and evaluation of cool coating effects in Singapore by weather research and forecasting coupled with urban canopy model simulations. Journal of Geophysical Research : Atmospheres, 125(13), e2019JD031191-. doi:10.1029/2019JD031191
Journal: Journal of Geophysical Research : Atmospheres 
Abstract: Mesoscale meteorological modeling was conducted to evaluate air temperature at 2‐m above surface (T2), wind speed/direction, and relative humidity (RH) in Singapore, a tropical city, for a dry period. A sensitivity study was conducted to determine the best combination of schemes for the physical modules. The model was used to study the urban heat island (UHI) effect and urban cooling effect by applying cool coating on various urban surfaces. Maximum UHI intensity of 3.2°C is found at nighttime (21:00) at a hot spot in the Commercial/Industrial area. At nighttime, when the UHI effect is generally more intense than daytime, applying cool coating on all urban surfaces can reduce the UHI effect by about 30% in residential areas and about 6% in commercial/industrial areas. Maximum T2 reduction of 3.1°C and surface skin temperature (TSK) reduction of 9.8°C due to cool coating is found at 13:00 at certain locations. The cool urban surfaces reduce radiative heat absorption during daytime, reducing heat storage in urban structures. This leads to subsequent reduction of stored heat release from urban structures, mitigating UHI effect during nighttime. Applying cool coating on horizontal surfaces (roofs and roads) provides more cooling effect than vertical surfaces (walls). Cool roofs provide more cooling effect than cool roads since roofs cover more urban horizontal surfaces than roads do in the current setting. Part of the radiation reflected by cool roads could be absorbed by other urban structures, reducing its cooling effect as compared to cool roofs.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/145845
ISSN: 2169-897X
DOI: 10.1029/2019JD031191
Rights: © 2020 American Geophysical Union. All rights reserved. This paper was published in Journal of Geophysical Research : Atmospheres and is made available with permission of American Geophysical Union.
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:MAE Journal Articles

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
2019JD031191.pdf10.33 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Page view(s)

173
Updated on May 26, 2022

Download(s) 50

109
Updated on May 26, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Plumx

Items in DR-NTU are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.