Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/148561
Title: Voices of the past, present, and future : how eighteenth-cen-tury Black writers reshape twenty-first-century academia — talking back to the enlightenment : practicing anti-racist teaching and learning in eighteenth-century British litera-ture (Roundtable)
Authors: Valenzuela, Jessica
Keywords: Humanities::Literature::English
Issue Date: 2021
Source: Valenzuela, J. (2021). Voices of the past, present, and future : how eighteenth-cen-tury Black writers reshape twenty-first-century academia — talking back to the enlightenment : practicing anti-racist teaching and learning in eighteenth-century British litera-ture (Roundtable). Studies in Religion and the Enlightenment, 2(2), 20-21. https://dx.doi.org/10.32655/srej.2021.2.2.7
Journal: Studies in Religion and the Enlightenment 
Abstract: To study US history, one must reopen wounds from the past trauma that has seeped down from generation to generation, inflicting pain on individuals of the Black com-munity. The same discrimination remains an ugly scar that is ever present in today’s social climate. This cycle of hatred has evolved over time, rooted in the transatlantic slave trade. Studying the writings of Black authors—such as Phillis Wheatley, Olaudah Equiano, and Ottobah Cugoano—is necessary to reshape academic discourse. These writings serve as important foundations for progressive acts toward racial justice. In an attempt to incorporate more Black voices into class curricula, members of academia have an important role in decid-ing who will be included on course reading lists and research activities. If students and teach-ers want to shape an inclusive space, they must hold conversations and discuss not only the root causes of racial discrimination but also how it has affected the current social climate in the United States. It is important to consider Black voices of the eighteenth century because students should be made aware of why the past is connected to racial discrimination in the present and why these issues perpetuate themselves. Wheatley, Equiano, and Cugoano each contribute to this dialogue. These writers were able to defend themselves, often writing with tropes like the “noble Negro” and using scriptural passages as a means of disproving the slan-der spewed by white egotistical male theorists like Immanuel Kant and David Hume.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/148561
ISSN: 2661-3336
DOI: 10.32655/srej.2021.2.2.7
Rights: © 2021 Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, & the Brigham Young University Faculty Publishing Service.
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:Studies in Religion and the Enlightenment

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