Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/148991
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dc.contributor.authorNio, Francesca Hui Shanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-21T13:25:56Z-
dc.date.available2021-05-21T13:25:56Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationNio, F. H. S. (2021). The sweetness of doing nothing. Final Year Project (FYP), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. https://hdl.handle.net/10356/148991en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10356/148991-
dc.description.abstractSingapore is well-known to be a fast-paced and competitive society, with many Singapore working adults being caught in a rat race – always striving to be better of others (Goh, 2016). As a result, working adults in Singapore are known to sleep the least and work amongst the longest hours in the world (Goh, 2018). This prevalent workaholic culture is detrimental to the wellbeing of working adults in the long run (Goh 2018). Ironically, even when working adults are given the opportunity to take time off work, they cannot help but feel guilty and stressed at the prospect of doing nothing (Ong, 2019). It has come to the point where work is second nature for working adults in Singapore and the idea of relaxation is uncomfortable for them. As a result, this project proposes a paradoxical idea – that Singapore working adults have to go slow in order to go fast and be more productive. In the movie ‘Eat Pray Love’, a character mentions an Italian phrase that goes, ‘dolce far niente’, which means pleasant idling or the sweetness of doing nothing (Murphy, 2010). This phrase is one that Singapore working adults should start embracing, instead of resisting. Hence, the main purpose of this project is to encourage Singapore working adults to take their minds off work and ‘dolce far niente’, even if it’s just for a brief moment. Through this project, the author hopes that Singaporeans will choose to take the first step in prioritising their well-being instead of burying their lives in work. The expected outcome is to be a space within space that provides refuge for workers, where they can leave their work behind for a moment and have the permission to be alone. It will be quiet, free from auditory and visual distractions and interruptions, so as to facilitate the 'dolce far niente' process. Specialisation: Product Design Keywords: emotional wellbeing, stillness, idle, workplace, work-life balanceen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNanyang Technological Universityen_US
dc.relationADM17.21.U1730194Den_US
dc.subjectVisual arts and music::Design::Producten_US
dc.titleThe sweetness of doing nothingen_US
dc.typeFinal Year Project (FYP)en_US
dc.contributor.supervisorJeffrey Hongen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorPeter Chen Chia Mienen_US
dc.contributor.schoolSchool of Art, Design and Mediaen_US
dc.description.degreeBachelor of Fine Arts in Design Arten_US
dc.contributor.supervisoremailJeffreyHong@ntu.edu.sg, PeterChen@ntu.edu.sgen_US
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Appears in Collections:ADM Student Reports (FYP/IA/PA/PI)
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