Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/149630
Title: Helping out-groups in times of crisis : application of the Benjamin Franklin Effect to intergroup contexts
Authors: Quek, Jing Xuan
Keywords: Social sciences::Psychology
Issue Date: 2021
Publisher: Nanyang Technological University
Source: Quek, J. X. (2021). Helping out-groups in times of crisis : application of the Benjamin Franklin Effect to intergroup contexts. Final Year Project (FYP), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. https://hdl.handle.net/10356/149630
Project: PSY-IRB-2020-048
Abstract: Improving positive intergroup attitudes and helping stigmatized out-groups is challenging today. The Benjamin Franklin Effect (BFE) seems to be one promising mechanism to encourage such changes. It predicts that when one performs a favor for someone whom they have neutral or negative feelings for, one would increase their liking for and be more likely to do another favor for that person again. This study investigates whether a kind act of donation to out-groups (migrant workers) during crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic would increase future donations and positive attitudes while decreasing threat perceptions and discriminatory attitudes towards them. A between-subject 2-session experiment was conducted with 4 groups in session 1: Control group (no donation information, no choice to donate), Forced Donate group (donation information present, no choice to donate), Free Donate and Free Never Donate (both given donation information and choice to donate). All participants were given the choice to donate in session 2. Contrary to predictions, no significant changes were found in positive attitudes and threat perceptions across all groups. Discrimination attitudes increased significantly in Forced Donate and decreased significantly in Free Donate groups. Those who donated in session 1 were more likely to donate in session 2, though insignificant. Free Donate was significantly more likely to donate again that Forced Donate. In conclusion, free choice appears to be more effective than induced compliance in maintaining pro-social acts and improving attitudes towards out-groups, driving the BFE.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/149630
Fulltext Permission: restricted
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:SSS Student Reports (FYP/IA/PA/PI)

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