Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/151217
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dc.contributor.authorPal, Anjanen_US
dc.contributor.authorChua, Alton Yeow Kuanen_US
dc.contributor.authorGoh, Dion Hoe-Lianen_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-02T03:30:26Z-
dc.date.available2021-07-02T03:30:26Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationPal, A., Chua, A. Y. K. & Goh, D. H. (2019). Debunking rumors on social media : the use of denials. Computers in Human Behavior, 96, 110-122. https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2019.02.022en_US
dc.identifier.issn0747-5632en_US
dc.identifier.other0000-0001-7203-7126-
dc.identifier.other0000-0002-5603-2453-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10356/151217-
dc.description.abstractThe literature currently lacks an understanding of how denials can be crafted to effectively debunk rumors on social media. Underpinned by the theory of planned behavior, this research develops denials by incorporating salient beliefs to enhance users’ likelihood to share such messages. Two related studies were conducted. The first was a survey of 276 participants to identify salient beliefs that could be incorporated to develop rumor denials. The following salient beliefs were identified in the survey: (i) Sharing denials helps to spread the truth; (ii) Friends and the online community encourage the behavior of sharing denials; and (iii) Source credibility of denials encourages sharing. From among the pool of survey participants, 206 took part in a second study that employed an experiment to measure the efficacy of the developed denials. The experiment revealed that denials incorporating all the salient beliefs had the greatest potential to influence users’ likelihood of sharing. With a theory-driven approach to develop denials, this research offers insights to practitioners such as social media managers and website authorities on ways to debunk rumors.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipMinistry of Education (MOE)en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relationMOE2014-T2-2-020en_US
dc.relation.ispartofComputers in Human Behavioren_US
dc.rights© 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectSocial sciences::Communicationen_US
dc.titleDebunking rumors on social media : the use of denialsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.schoolWee Kim Wee School of Communication and Informationen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chb.2019.02.022-
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85062732269-
dc.identifier.volume96en_US
dc.identifier.spage110en_US
dc.identifier.epage122en_US
dc.subject.keywordsRumoren_US
dc.subject.keywordsDenialen_US
dc.description.acknowledgementThis work was supported by the Ministry of Education Research Grant AcRF Tier 2 (MOE2014-T2-2-020).en_US
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
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