Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/151337
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dc.contributor.authorKim, Seo Youngen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchmitt, Bernd H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorThalmann, Nadia Magnenaten_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-09T01:28:19Z-
dc.date.available2021-07-09T01:28:19Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationKim, S. Y., Schmitt, B. H. & Thalmann, N. M. (2019). Eliza in the uncanny valley : anthropomorphizing consumer robots increases their perceived warmth but decreases liking. Marketing Letters, 30(1), 1-12. https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11002-019-09485-9en_US
dc.identifier.issn0923-0645en_US
dc.identifier.other0000-0002-5129-0912-
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10356/151337-
dc.description.abstractConsumer robots are predicted to be employed in a variety of customer-facing situations. As these robots are designed to look and behave like humans, consumers attribute human traits to them—a phenomenon known as the “Eliza Effect.” In four experiments, we show that the anthropomorphism of a consumer robot increases psychological warmth but decreases attitudes, due to uncanniness. Competence judgments are much less affected and not subject to a decrease in attitudes. The current research contributes to research on artificial intelligence, anthropomorphism, and the uncanny valley phenomenon. We suggest to managers that they need to make sure that the appearances and behaviors of robots are not too human-like to avoid negative attitudes toward robots. Moreover, managers and researchers should collaborate to determine the optimal level of anthropomorphism.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMarketing Lettersen_US
dc.rights© 2019 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectBusiness::Industries and laboren_US
dc.titleEliza in the uncanny valley : anthropomorphizing consumer robots increases their perceived warmth but decreases likingen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.researchInstitute for Media Innovation (IMI)en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11002-019-09485-9-
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85063050698-
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.volume30en_US
dc.identifier.spage1en_US
dc.identifier.epage12en_US
dc.subject.keywordsAnthropomorphismen_US
dc.subject.keywordsConsumer Robotsen_US
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
Appears in Collections:IMI Journal Articles

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