Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/151768
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dc.contributor.authorFu, Shaoxiongen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Xiaoyuen_US
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Hanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-30T04:28:22Z-
dc.date.available2021-06-30T04:28:22Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationFu, S., Chen, X. & Zheng, H. (2021). Exploring an adverse impact of smartphone overuse on academic performance via health issues : a stimulus-organism-response perspective. Behaviour & Information Technology, 40(7), 663-675. https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0144929X.2020.1716848en_US
dc.identifier.issn1362-3001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10356/151768-
dc.description.abstractWhile previous research suggests that smartphone overuse relates to users’ adverse health issues such as insomnia, nomophobia, and poor eyesight, few studies have explored the mediating role of such health issues in the relationship between smartphone overuse and academic performance. Guided by the Stimulus-Organism-Response (S-O-R) framework, this study develops a model to understand the relationships among students’ smartphone overuse, health issues (i.e., insomnia, nomophobia, and poor eyesight), and academic performance. Moreover, we introduce a moderating role of health information literacy in the relationship between smartphone overuse and health issues. To validate the model, we collect representative data through a large-scale field survey at a public university in China. 6,855 valid responses are retained for data analysis using a structural equation modeling technique. The main results are: (1) health issues—insomnia, nomophobia, and poor eyesight— partially mediate the relationship between smartphone overuse and students’ academic performance; (2) health information literacy can moderate the relationship between smartphone overuse and the health issues including insomnia and poor eyesight, while the relationship between smartphone overuse and nomophobia is not affected. Finally, we draw related theoretical and practical implications.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBehaviour & Information Technologyen_US
dc.rightsThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Behaviour & Information Technology on 21 Jan 2020, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/0144929X.2020.1716848en_US
dc.subjectLibrary and information scienceen_US
dc.titleExploring an adverse impact of smartphone overuse on academic performance via health issues : a stimulus-organism-response perspectiveen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.schoolWee Kim Wee School of Communication and Informationen_US
dc.contributor.organizationWuhan Universityen_US
dc.contributor.organizationCopenhagen Business Schoolen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0144929X.2020.1716848-
dc.description.versionAccepted versionen_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.volume40en_US
dc.identifier.spage663en_US
dc.identifier.epage675en_US
dc.subject.keywordsAcademic Performanceen_US
dc.subject.keywordsHealth Information Literacyen_US
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