Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/153815
Title: Periodontitis associates with species-specific gene expression of the oral microbiota
Authors: Belstrøm, Daniel
Constancias, Florentin
Drautz-Moses, Daniela Isabel
Schuster, Stephan Christoph
Veleba, Mark
Mahé, Frédéric
Givskov, Michael
Keywords: Engineering::Environmental engineering
Issue Date: 2021
Source: Belstrøm, D., Constancias, F., Drautz-Moses, D. I., Schuster, S. C., Veleba, M., Mahé, F. & Givskov, M. (2021). Periodontitis associates with species-specific gene expression of the oral microbiota. Npj Biofilms and Microbiomes, 7(1), 76-. https://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41522-021-00247-y
Journal: npj Biofilms and Microbiomes 
Abstract: The purpose of the present investigation was to characterize species-specific bacterial activity of the oral microbiota in periodontitis. We tested the hypotheses that chronic inflammation, i.e., periodontitis, associates with bacterial gene expression of the oral microbiota. Oral microbial samples were collected from three oral sites-subgingival plaque, tongue, and saliva from patients with periodontitis and healthy controls. Paired metagenomics and metatranscriptomics were used to perform concomitant characterization of taxonomic composition and to determine species-specific bacterial activity as expressed by the ratio of specific messenger RNA reads to their corresponding genomic DNA reads. Here, we show the association of periodontitis with bacterial gene expression of the oral microbiota. While oral site was the main determinant of taxonomic composition as well as bacterial gene expression, periodontitis was significantly associated with a reduction of carbohydrate metabolism of the oral microbiota at three oral sites (subgingival plaque, tongue, and saliva). Data from the present study revealed the association of periodontitis with bacterial gene expression of the oral microbiota. Conditions of periodontitis was associated with bacterial activity of local subgingival plaque, but also on tongue and the salivary microbiota. Collectively, data suggest that periodontitis associates with impaired carbohydrate metabolism of the oral microbiota. Future longitudinal and interventional studies are warranted to evaluate the potential pathogenic role of impaired bacterial carbohydrate metabolism not only in periodontitis but also in other diseases with low-grade inflammation, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/153815
ISSN: 2055-5008
DOI: 10.1038/s41522-021-00247-y
Rights: © 2021 The Author(s). This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:SCELSE Journal Articles

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