Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/155913
Title: The salience of choice fuels independence : implications for self-perception, cognition, and behavior
Authors: Nanakdewa, Kevin
Madan, Shilpa
Savani, Krishna
Markus, Hazel Rose
Keywords: Business::General
Issue Date: 2021
Source: Nanakdewa, K., Madan, S., Savani, K. & Markus, H. R. (2021). The salience of choice fuels independence : implications for self-perception, cognition, and behavior. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), 118(30), e2021727118-. https://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2021727118
Journal: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) 
Abstract: More than ever before, people across the world are exposed to ideas of choice and have opportunities to make choices. What are the consequences of this rapidly expanding exposure to the ideas and practice of choice? The current research investigated an unexamined and potentially powerful consequence of this salience of choice: an awareness and experience of independence. Four studies (n = 1,288) across three cultural contexts known to differ in both the salience of choice and the cultural emphasis on independence (the United States, Singapore, and India) provided converging evidence of a link between the salience of choice and independence. Singaporean students who recalled choices rather than actions represented themselves as larger than their peers (study 1). Conceptually replicating this finding, study 2 found that Americans who recalled choices rather than actions rated themselves as physically stronger. In a word/nonword lexical decision task (study 3), Singaporean students who recalled choices rather than actions were quicker at identifying independence-related words, but not neutral or interdependence-related words. Americans, Singaporeans, and Indians all indicated that when working in an organization that emphasized choice, they would be more likely to express their opinions. Similarly, Americans, Singaporeans, and Indians reported a preference for working in such an organization (studies 4a and 4b). The findings suggest that the salience of personal choice may drive an awareness and experience of independence even in contexts where, unlike in the United States, independence has not been the predominant ethos. Choice may be an unmarked and proximate mechanism of cultural change and growing global individualism.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/155913
ISSN: 0027-8424
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.2021727118
Rights: © The Author(s). All rights reserved. This paper was published by National Academy of Sciences in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) and is made available with permission of The Author(s).
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:NBS Journal Articles

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