Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/157157
Title: The relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACE), self-objectification, father-child bonding styles, and self-sexualizing behaviors
Authors: Lam, Rachel Jia Yi
Keywords: Social sciences::Psychology
Issue Date: 2022
Publisher: Nanyang Technological University
Source: Lam, R. J. Y. (2022). The relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACE), self-objectification, father-child bonding styles, and self-sexualizing behaviors. Final Year Project (FYP), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. https://hdl.handle.net/10356/157157
Project: PSY-IRB-2021-018
Abstract: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACE), father-child bonding styles, self-objectification and self-sexualizing behaviors. In doing so, this study also intended to find out if the relationship between these variables were mediated by others approval-contingent self-worth (OASW). Thus, a sample of 269 participants, aged 21 to 35, were recruited via convenience sampling online using social media platforms Instagram, Telegram and Whatsapp. Participants were tasked to complete a survey including demographics, ACE questionnaire, Parental Bonding Instrument, OASW questionnaire, self-objectification questionnaire, self-sexualizing behaviors questions and a shortened form of the social desirability scale. Results found that ACE was significantly associated with self-objectification (F = 14.819, p = 0.000). Additionally, paternal care (F = 11.501, p = 0.000) and paternal overprotection (F = 10.148, p = 0.000) were also significantly associated with self-objectification. None of the other hypothesized relationships were observed. Additionally, the relationship between ACE and self-objectification was the only one significantly mediated by OASW. In conclusion, ACE and paternal overprotection were significantly and positively associated with self-objectification, while paternal care was significantly and negatively associated to self-objectification. This paper suggested areas for future research and discussed applying its findings to reducing self-objectification.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/157157
Fulltext Permission: restricted
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:SSS Student Reports (FYP/IA/PA/PI)

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