Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/161002
Title: Controlling droplet impact velocity and droplet volume: key factors to achieving high cell viability in sub-nanoliter droplet-based bioprinting
Authors: Ng, Wei Long
Huang, Xi
Shkolnikov, Viktor
Goh, Guo Liang
Suntornnond, Ratima
Yeong, Wai Yee
Keywords: Engineering::Mechanical engineering
Issue Date: 2022
Source: Ng, W. L., Huang, X., Shkolnikov, V., Goh, G. L., Suntornnond, R. & Yeong, W. Y. (2022). Controlling droplet impact velocity and droplet volume: key factors to achieving high cell viability in sub-nanoliter droplet-based bioprinting. International Journal of Bioprinting, 8(1), 424-. https://dx.doi.org/10.18063/ijb.v8i1.424
Journal: International Journal of Bioprinting 
Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting systems serve as advanced manufacturing platform for the precise deposition of cells and biomaterials at pre-defined positions. Among the various bioprinting techniques, the drop-on-demand jetting approach facilitates deposition of pico/nanoliter droplets of cells and materials for study of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Despite advances in the bioprinting systems, there is a poor understanding of how the viability of primary human cells within sub-nanoliter droplets is affected during the printing process. In this work, a thermal inkjet system is utilized to dispense sub-nanoliter cell-laden droplets, and two key factors - droplet impact velocity and droplet volume - are identified to have significant effect on the viability and proliferation of printed cells. An increase in the cell concentration results in slower impact velocity, which leads to higher viability of the printed cells and improves the printing outcome by mitigating droplet splashing. Furthermore, a minimum droplet volume of 20 nL per spot helps to mitigate evaporation-induced cell damage and maintain high viability of the printed cells within a printing duration of 2 min. Hence, controlling the droplet impact velocity and droplet volume in sub-nanoliter bioprinting is critical for viability and proliferation of printed human primary cells.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/161002
ISSN: 2424-8002
DOI: 10.18063/ijb.v8i1.424
Schools: School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 
Research Centres: Singapore Centre for 3D Printing 
HP-NTU Digital Manufacturing Corporate Lab
Rights: © 2021 Author(s). This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, permitting distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:MAE Journal Articles
SC3DP Journal Articles

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