Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/162144
Title: Interests, ideologies, and great power spheres of influence
Authors: Resnick, Evan N.
Keywords: Social sciences::Political science::International relations
Issue Date: 2022
Source: Resnick, E. N. (2022). Interests, ideologies, and great power spheres of influence. European Journal of International Relations, 28(3), 563-588. https://dx.doi.org/10.1177/13540661221098217
Journal: European Journal of International Relations
Abstract: Militarily aggressive actions by Russia and China in recent years have sparked a debate among foreign policy commentators regarding the utility of spheres of influence, even as International Relations (IR) scholars have continued to neglect the phenomenon. This article tests three rival theories that attempt to explain the spheres of influence behavior of great powers. Structural realism proposes that a great power will cede a small power to the sphere of a rival that possesses a stronger material interest in the small power and is a peer competitor, and that a consequent rupture or crisis in the sphere will lead the great power to engage in vigorous but restricted cooperation with the restive small power that maintains the previously granted sphere. Ideological distance theory (IDT) hypothesizes that a great power will steadfastly oppose ceding an ideologically homogeneous small power to the sphere of an ideologically divergent peer competitor, and that a rupture in a previously granted sphere will result in noncooperation between the great power grantor and restive small power if they are ideologically heterogeneous. I introduce a third approach, modified ideological distance theory (MIDT), which predicts that a great power will temporarily oppose ceding an ideologically homogeneous small power to the sphere of an ideologically divergent peer competitor, and will engage in delayed and attenuated cooperation with an ideologically heterogeneous small power following a rupture in a peer competitor’s sphere. Examination of the United States’ relationship with Yugoslavia (1948–1955) and the Soviet Union’s relationship with Cuba (1960–1962) demonstrates MIDT’s explanatory superiority.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/162144
ISSN: 1354-0661
DOI: 10.1177/13540661221098217
Rights: © 2022 The Author(s). All rights reserved.
Fulltext Permission: none
Fulltext Availability: No Fulltext
Appears in Collections:RSIS Journal Articles

Page view(s)

41
Updated on Dec 5, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Plumx

Items in DR-NTU are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.