Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/163565
Title: Blockchain technology in supply chain management - food industry
Authors: Leong, Chris Shao Jun
Keywords: Business::Management::Logistics
Engineering::Maritime studies
Issue Date: 2022
Publisher: Nanyang Technological University
Source: Leong, C. S. J. (2022). Blockchain technology in supply chain management - food industry. Final Year Project (FYP), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. https://hdl.handle.net/10356/163565
Abstract: The emergence of blockchain technologies has made a considerable impact on many industries. Applications of blockchain technology extend well beyond cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. With its capability to provide transparency and end-to-end-traceability while saving businesses time and money. The technology helps many different industries in ways ranging from contract enforcement to more effective government operation. Within the food supply chain, there are limited studies focusing on how blockchain can help tackle food fraud. Much of the past research focuses on how to improve supply chain efficiency using blockchain technology. Blockchain was created to make transactions more secure. As such, each transaction that occurs in the food supply chain can be made in an immutable manner, with instantaneous visibility. This provides a huge advantage in the global efforts to fight against food fraud. The history of food fraud traces back to the middle ages when a resourceful fraudster makes a sizable profit by passing off cheap local herbs as expensive foreign spices such as black pepper and cinnamon. Recent food fraud incidents such as the 2008 Chinese Melamine Milk and 2013 Horse Meat Scandal sparked outrage in consumers demanding for a global effort involving all stakeholders at all levels to fight against food fraud. Food fraud has plagued the food supply chain for years, but blockchain technology has the ability to change that. The crucial role that blockchain plays in food fraud will be discussed in this paper together with its limitations, challenges and suggestions to improve blockchain adoption in the food supply chains.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/163565
Schools: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering 
Fulltext Permission: restricted
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:CEE Student Reports (FYP/IA/PA/PI)

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