Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/168494
Title: Comparing the effects of task-switching and language-switching on working memory in bilingual young adults
Authors: Huang, Ruijia
Keywords: Social sciences::Psychology::Consciousness and cognition
Issue Date: 2023
Publisher: Nanyang Technological University
Source: Huang, R. (2023). Comparing the effects of task-switching and language-switching on working memory in bilingual young adults. Final Year Project (FYP), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. https://hdl.handle.net/10356/168494
Project: IRB-2022-009 
Abstract: Title: Comparing the effects of task-switching and language-switching on working memory in bilingual young adults Objective: To compare the costs to cognitive resources incurred by domain-general and domain-specific switching Methods: A computer-paced, within-subject experiment was designed. A total of 38 participants aged 18-25 performed complex span tasks, where they needed to memorise 5 serially presented coloured shapes, verbally process 8 digits, and recall the shapes. There were 4 conditions in the processing component: task-switching, language-switching, single-task, and single-language. The duration, pace and number of switches in the processing components were kept constant. Results: Consistent with Hypothesis 1a, absolute recall was significantly lower in the language-switching condition compared to the single-language condition, but contrary to Hypothesis 1b, no significance was found between absolute recall in the task-switching condition and the single-task condition. Support was found for Hypothesis 2 as no significant difference in absolute recall was found between task- and language-switching. But for partial recall, there was no significant difference among all the conditions. Conclusion: Task- and language-switching incurred similar cognitive costs, as measured by WM. In addition, participants likely have superior efficiency in single-language processing, either through binding or practices in inhibition. These findings contribute to the understanding of the nature and burden of linguistic versus non-linguistic switching practices.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/168494
Schools: School of Social Sciences 
Research Centres: Centre for Research and Development in Learning (CRADLE) 
Fulltext Permission: embargo_restricted_20250602
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:SSS Student Reports (FYP/IA/PA/PI)

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