Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/171857
Title: The effects of post-activation performance enhancement for deadlift vs back squat on vertical jump among competitive basketball players
Authors: Chen, Leslie Kai Lin
Keywords: Science::General
Issue Date: 2023
Publisher: Nanyang Technological University
Source: Chen, L. K. L. (2023). The effects of post-activation performance enhancement for deadlift vs back squat on vertical jump among competitive basketball players. Final Year Project (FYP), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. https://hdl.handle.net/10356/171857
Abstract: Theoretically, post-activation performance enhancement (PAPE) promotes force production and power post-heavy resistance training. PAPE seeks to elicit increased muscular strength and force production by preconditioning the muscles during exercises like jumping, throwing, sprinting, and weightlifting. This study aimed to investigate the potentiation effect between back squats (BS) and hex bar deadlifts (HBD) on vertical jump performance. Second, this study investigated the relationship between relative strength and counter-movement jump (CMJ) height across both exercises. This study included 18 male (1.62 ± 0.24 relative BS 1RM; 1.86 ± 0.25 relative HBD 1RM) competitive athletes, who completed a set of 3RM before performing a series of countermovement jumps on a force platform at 15s, 4m, 8m, 12m, 16m, and 20m post-exercise. No significant differences (all p > 0.05) were found between the baseline and the 6 different jumps, across jump height (𝜂𝑝 2 = 0.035), modified reactive strength index (𝜂𝑝 2 = 0.026), and peak power output (𝜂𝑝 2 = 0.036). However, there was a moderate positive correlation (p = 0.008) between relative BS strength and average CMJ height, but no correlation (p > 0.05) was found between relative HBD strength and average CMJ height. Despite literature reporting PAPE using a similar set of 3RM, this study concludes that careful manipulation of PAPE variables (i.e., training status, intensity, volume, exercise selection, rest intervals, and time of day is necessary to potentially elicit PAPE.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/171857
Fulltext Permission: restricted
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:SSM Student Reports (FYP/IA/PA/PI)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
FYP Report_Leslie Chen.pdf
  Restricted Access
Undergraduate project report1.03 MBAdobe PDFView/Open

Page view(s)

163
Updated on Jun 15, 2024

Download(s)

4
Updated on Jun 15, 2024

Google ScholarTM

Check

Items in DR-NTU are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.