Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/44752
Title: Functional role of APP in mediating adult neurogenesis
Authors: Joshva Sundara Raj Jasmine Celina
Keywords: DRNTU::Science::Biological sciences
Issue Date: 2011
Abstract: Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) signaling pathway was shown to be negatively implicated in embryonic neurogenesis. Hence in this study, the role APP in mediating adult neurogenesis was investigated in vivo using APP wildtype (WT) and knockout (KO) adult mice at the two neurogenic micrcoenvironments- subventricualar zone (SVZ) of lateral ventricles (LV) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of dentate gyrus (DG). Neural Stem Cell (NSC) proliferation study with 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation at SVZ imply that APP may positively regulate NSC proliferation. Additionally, immuonhistochemistry (IHC) results suggest that APP may also enhance the differentiation of NSCs into olfactory bulb (OB) neurons. Whereas, the findings attained for hippocampal neurogenesis imply that APP may be a negative regulator of differentiation of NSCs into neurons in hippocampus. Though the inconsistencies in the results make it somewhat difficult to draw a profound link that APP might hold with neurogenesis, they do imply to a certain extent that APP impacts neurogenesis perhaps in different ways in the two neurogenic niches. Nonetheless, these results reflect the fact that neurogenesis is constantly subjected to the control of regulatory factors and that APP may exert its regulatory role together with other factors in an orchestrated manner.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10356/44752
Rights: Nanyang Technological University
Fulltext Permission: restricted
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:SBS Student Reports (FYP/IA/PA/PI)

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