Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/47412
Title: Counter terrorism : comparing the Singapore and Saudi Arabia experiences.
Authors: Salim Mohamed Nasir.
Keywords: DRNTU::Social sciences::Sociology::Terrorism
Issue Date: 2010
Abstract: Successfully countering terrorist or extremist ideologies has taken on added importance in the counterterrorism efforts of many states in recent years. There is growing recognition that eliminating terrorists using military means may not be effective in reducing the terrorist threat. As terrorism stems from conflicted understandings of religious ideologies, counterterrorism authorities would do well to counter the ideological justifications for violent extremism. It is a task that relies extensively on the capabilities of the authority and its related agencies with the collaborative efforts of the community. Broad communication campaigns and affirmative actions undertaken by all parties involved have created the necessary awareness of the dangers of extremist ideologies from mushrooming and resulting in disharmony and destruction to lives and properties. This thesis compares the counterterrorism experiences of Singapore and Saudi Arabia, especially the rehabilitation or deradicalisation programmes they have developed to reeducate extremists and reintegrate them back into society. Critical success factors are discussed at the level of the individual or actors and the authorities in managing the problem of terrorist detainee deradicalization and rehabilitation. While the 'soft' approaches taken by both countries are specific to their cultural and political settings, those who are interested in or involved in developing deradicalisation programmes can draw lessons from the experiences of Singapore and Saudi Arabia in the fight to undermine the appeal of extremist ideologies.
Description: 57 p.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10356/47412
Rights: Nanyang Technological University
Fulltext Permission: restricted
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:RSIS Theses

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