Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/70396
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dc.contributor.authorNur Syahirah Binte Suradi
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T01:36:39Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T01:36:39Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10356/70396
dc.description.abstractIn Japanese maternal horror films, motherhood becomes a visually horrifying spectacle. Monstrous and abject representations of motherhood do not necessarily rely on monstrous depictions of the mothers themselves. The horror of motherhood also lies in the destructive mother-child relationship as it reveals the potentially devastating effects maternal failure may have on a child. While female yūrei, or spirits, from Japanese folklore depict physical monstrosity, monstrosity also lies in the mother’s inability to fulfil her maternal role. Maternal mental illness and single or divorced mothers become associated with monstrosity and maternal failure. This thesis will argue that monstrous and abject representations of motherhood and the mother-child relationship in Japanese maternal horror actually propagates a double layer of maternal stigma and reveals underlying cultural anxieties towards these stigmatised mothers.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn Japanese maternal horror films, motherhood becomes a visually horrifying spectacle. Monstrous and abject representations of motherhood do not necessarily rely on monstrous depictions of the mothers themselves. The horror of motherhood also lies in the destructive mother-child relationship as it reveals the potentially devastating effects maternal failure may have on a child. While female yūrei, or spirits, from Japanese folklore depict physical monstrosity, monstrosity also lies in the mother’s inability to fulfil her maternal role. Maternal mental illness and single or divorced mothers become associated with monstrosity and maternal failure. This thesis will argue that monstrous and abject representations of motherhood and the mother-child relationship in Japanese maternal horror actually propagates a double layer of maternal stigma and reveals underlying cultural anxieties towards these stigmatised mothers.en_US
dc.format.extent36 p.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsNanyang Technological University
dc.subjectDRNTU::Social sciences::Mass media::Broadcasting::Motion pictures and films::Asian cinemaen_US
dc.subjectDRNTU::Social sciences::Mass media::Broadcasting::Motion pictures and films::Film theory and criticismen_US
dc.subjectDRNTU::Humanities::Literatureen_US
dc.titleDouble maternal stigma : single, mad mothers in Japanese maternal horroren_US
dc.typeFinal Year Project (FYP)en_US
dc.contributor.supervisorYong Wern Meien_US
dc.contributor.schoolSchool of Humanities and Social Sciencesen_US
dc.description.degreeBachelor of Artsen_US
item.grantfulltextrestricted-
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Appears in Collections:HSS Student Reports (FYP/IA/PA/PI)
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