Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/80931
Title: Subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a cross-sectional study of a random population sample aged 18 to 65 years
Authors: Ludwig, Ulla
Holzner, Daniela
Denzer, Christian
Greinert, Artur
Haenle, Mark Martin
Oeztuerk, Suemeyra
Koenig, Wolfgang
Boehm, Bernhard Otto
Mason, Richard Andrew
Kratzer, Wolfgang
Graeter, Tilmann
Keywords: Hypothyroidism
NASH
Cross-sectional studies
NAFLD
Thyroid
Issue Date: 2015
Source: Ludwig, U., Holzner, D., Denzer, C., Greinert, A., Haenle, M. M., Oeztuerk, S., et al (2015). Subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a cross-sectional study of a random population sample aged 18 to 65 years. BMC Endocrine Disorders, 15, 41-.
Series/Report no.: BMC Endocrine Disorders
Abstract: Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common disorders of the liver worldwide. Recently, a correlation between thyroid dysfunction and NAFLD has been discussed. Objective of the present study was to investigate the association between thyroid dysfunction and hepatic steatosis. Methods: Data from 2,445 subjects (51.7 % females) aged 18 to 65 years participating in a population-based cross-sectional study were assessed based on a standardized questionnaire and documentation of physical, biochemical and ultrasonographic findings. After application of exclusion criteria, a total of 1,276 subjects were included in the study collective. The influence of potential factors on the development of hepatic steatosis was assessed using multivariate logistic regression. Results: The prevalence of hepatic steatosis in the study collective was 27.4 % (n = 349). The serum thyroxin (TT4) concentration in subjects with hepatic steatosis was reduced (p = 0.0004). Adjusting for age, or BMI, there was an increased prevalence of hepatic steatosis in subjects with reduced TT4 concentrations (p = 0.0143; p = <.0001). Conclusions: The findings of the present study confirm an association between both subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism and hepatic steatosis.
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/80931
http://hdl.handle.net/10220/38990
ISSN: 1472-6823
DOI: 10.1186/s12902-015-0030-5
Rights: © 2015 Ludwig et al. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Fulltext Permission: open
Fulltext Availability: With Fulltext
Appears in Collections:LKCMedicine Journal Articles

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