Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/81163
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dc.contributor.authorAlbano, Adrianen
dc.contributor.authorvan Dongen, Elsen
dc.contributor.authorTakeda, Shinyaen
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-02T02:19:36Zen
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-06T14:22:46Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-02T02:19:36Zen
dc.date.available2019-12-06T14:22:46Z-
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationAlbano, A., van Dongen, E., & Takeda, S. (2015). Legal pluralism, forest conservation, and indigenous capitalists : the case of the Kalanguya in Tinoc, the Philippines. Nature and Culture, 10(1), 103-127. doi:10.3167/nc.2015.100106en
dc.identifier.issn1558-6073en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10356/81163-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10220/50071en
dc.description.abstractThe Philippines is one of the many countries that currently acknowledge the presence of indigenous peoples (IPs) within their territories. This acknowledgment often comes with a formal recognition of the rights of IPs, including the right to practice their customary laws. Because of the equal existence of overarching state laws, this formally leads to a situation of legal pluralism for IPs. For many forest conservation advocates, legal pluralism for IPs, particularly with regard to land ownership and forest management, is expected to help conserve forests. This expectation, however, is founded on the erroneous assumption that the traditional land use of IPs is nondestructive and that traditional land ownership is communal. Using a relatively long historical perspective, this article demonstrates that these assumptions do not apply to the Kalanguya of Tinoc, the Philippines. In contrast to the notion of IPs being market-averse, this article further demonstrates that many Kalanguya have been and remain “capitalists”. The article favors the inclusion of a market-based forest conservation policy, which is arguably consistent with the reality of value pluralism.en
dc.format.extent18 p.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNature and Cultureen
dc.rightsThis is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedited version of an article published in Nature and Culture. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Albano, A., van Dongen, E., & Takeda, S. (2015). Legal pluralism, forest conservation, and indigenous capitalists : the case of the Kalanguya in Tinoc, the Philippines. Nature and Culture, 10(1), 103-127 is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.3167/nc.2015.100106en
dc.subjectCustomary Lawen
dc.subjectIndigenous Peoplesen
dc.subjectHumanities::History::Asia::Philippinesen
dc.titleLegal pluralism, forest conservation, and indigenous capitalists : the case of the Kalanguya in Tinoc, the Philippinesen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.schoolSchool of Humanitiesen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3167/nc.2015.100106en
dc.description.versionAccepted versionen
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