Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/83239
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dc.contributor.authorNg, Xu Wenen
dc.contributor.authorSubbu, Venkatramanen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-26T04:25:45Zen
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-06T15:18:08Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-26T04:25:45Zen
dc.date.available2019-12-06T15:18:08Z-
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationNg, X. W., & Subbu, V. (2015). Protein delivery options: how well have we succeeded? Therapeutic Delivery, 6(5), 537-539.en
dc.identifier.issn2041-5990en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10356/83239-
dc.description.abstractOf the ten top-selling drugs in 2013, the first three (Humira®, Enbrel®, Remicade®) were all monoclonal antibodies for treating autoimmune diseases; together these three accounted for approximately $28 billion in sales. Another antibody, Avastin®, indicated for bowel cancer, accounted for $6.7 billion among these top-selling drugs, while Herceptin®, used to treat breast cancer, had sales of $6.6 billion. These numbers bear eloquent testimony to the increasing demand for protein therapeutics. All of these proteins are made by recombinant synthesis which has truly revolutionized the ready availability of human analogs. Such antibodies are administered via subcutaneous injection or via intravenous infusion; the frequency of administration varies. For example, Enbrel is injected subcutaneously once a week for rheumatoid arthritis whereas Remicade dosing is 3 mg/kg given via intravenous induction at 0, 2 and 6 weeks. While the number of protein therapeutics has grown substantially over the last decade [1], delivery systems continue to be limited. We examine the reasons for this and discuss what we can expect in the future.en
dc.format.extent5 p.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTherapeutic Deliveryen
dc.rights© 2015 Future Science Ltd. This is the author created version of a work that has been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by Therapeutic Delivery, Future Science Ltd. It incorporates referee’s comments but changes resulting from the publishing process, such as copyediting, structural formatting, may not be reflected in this document. The published version is available at: [http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/tde.15.11].en
dc.subjectProteinen
dc.subjectRecombinant Antibodiesen
dc.titleProtein delivery options: how well have we succeeded?en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.schoolSchool of Materials Science & Engineeringen
dc.identifier.doi10.4155/tde.15.11en
dc.description.versionAccepted versionen
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item.grantfulltextopen-
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