Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/10356/84358
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dc.contributor.authorTay, Wei Hongen
dc.contributor.authorChong, Kelvin Kian Longen
dc.contributor.authorKline, Kimberly A.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-14T05:41:02Zen
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-06T15:43:28Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-14T05:41:02Zen
dc.date.available2019-12-06T15:43:28Z-
dc.date.issued2016en
dc.identifier.citationTay, W. H., Chong, K. K. L., & Kline, K. A. (2016). Polymicrobial–Host Interactions during Infection. Journal of Molecular Biology, 428(17), 3355-3371.en
dc.identifier.issn0022-2836en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10356/84358-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10220/43575en
dc.description.abstractMicrobial pathogenesis research has, historically, focused on the study of infections as monomicrobial events. However, the advent of next generation sequencing and culture-independent identification methods has revealed that many, if not most, infections are polymicrobial either in origin or in manifestation. Polymicrobial infections are often associated with increased infection severity and poorer patient outcome. Multiple infecting microbes can interact synergistically to induce virulence traits, alter the infected niche, or modulate the host immune response, all of which can promote polymicrobial infection. Importantly, a polymicrobial environment at the time of inoculation, consisting of multiple pathogens or pathogens in combination with the native microbiota, can contribute to the pathogenic progression of a single predominant organism at the time of diagnosis. Hence, in order to completely understand and elucidate the impact of these polymicrobial interactions on infection outcomes, a thorough examination of the entire microbial community present throughout the pathogenic cascade is required: from the time of inoculation to symptomology to resolution. In this review, we highlight the themes of metabolite exploitation, immune modulation, niche optimization, and virulence induction that contribute to polymicrobial infections. We focus on recent literature about microbe–microbe and microbe–host interactions that promote polymicrobial infections with an emphasis on understanding these interactions to identify better interventions for these sometimes complex infections.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNRF (Natl Research Foundation, S’pore)en
dc.description.sponsorshipMOE (Min. of Education, S’pore)en
dc.format.extent42 p.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Molecular Biologyen
dc.rights© 2016 Elsevier. This is the author created version of a work that has been peer reviewed and accepted for publication by Journal of Molecular Biology, Elsevier. It incorporates referee’s comments but changes resulting from the publishing process, such as copyediting, structural formatting, may not be reflected in this document. The published version is available at: [http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2016.05.006].en
dc.subjectUTIen
dc.subjectWound Infectionen
dc.titlePolymicrobial–Host Interactions during Infectionen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.schoolInterdisciplinary Graduate School (IGS)en
dc.contributor.schoolSchool of Biological Sciencesen
dc.contributor.organizationSingapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineeringen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2016.05.006en
dc.description.versionAccepted versionen
item.grantfulltextopen-
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Appears in Collections:IGS Journal Articles
SBS Journal Articles
SCELSE Journal Articles
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